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Introduction ‘Sometimes I end up doing it [sex under the influence of drugs] on a midweek afternoon with maybe just one bloke from Grindr, sometimes it’s ten people on a weekend … there are drugs and Viagra, you know it’s gonna be fun.’ (Ben, 55–65, Manchester) The use of recreational drugs to enhance and facilitate sex, mostly among men who have sex with men is now commonly referred as ‘chemsex’. Despite originating in the London scene in relation to the use of GHB/GHL, often referred to as ‘G’, crystal methamphetamine, often referred to as ‘tina’ or

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Following the development of anti-retroviral therapies (ARVs), many people affected by HIV in the 1980s and 1990s have now been living with the condition for decades.

Drawing on perspectives from leading scholars in Bangladesh, Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Switzerland, Ukraine, the UK and the US, as well as research from India and Kenya, this book explores the experiences of sex and sexuality in individuals and groups living with HIV in later life (50+). Contributions consider the impacts of stigma, barriers to intimacy, physiological sequelae, long-term care, undetectability, pleasure and biomedical prevention (TasP and PrEP).

With increasing global availability of ARVs and ageing populations, this book offers essential future directions, practical applications and implications for both policy and research.

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Public Space, Sexuality and Revolt

Pussy grabbing; hot mommas; topless protest; nasty women. Whether hypersexualised, desexualised, venerated or maligned, women’s bodies in public space continue to be framed as a problem. A problem that is discursively ‘solved’ by the continued proliferation of rape culture in everyday life.

Indeed, despite the rise in research and public awareness about rape culture and sexism in contemporary debates, gendered violence continues to be normalised.

Using case studies from the US and UK – the de/sexualised pregnancy, the troublesome naked protest, the errant BDSM player – Fanghanel interrogates how the female body is figured through, and revolts against, gendered violence.

Rape culture currently thrives. This book demonstrates how it happens, the politics that are mobilised to sustain it, and how we might act to contest it.

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This volume, third in a series of five on sexuality in later life, brings together the experiences of women, gay men, trans women and hijra from around the world as they describe what it means to live with HIV and navigate the often fraught areas of sex, sexuality, intimacy and relationships in later life. New drug treatments have transformed the lives and expectations of people living with HIV. In this book we hear from people living in Aotearoa New Zealand, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Switzerland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom who are not only living with HIV but also facing stigma imposed on them by others. Too often they have learned to stigmatise themselves. Since no single approach or way of writing can capture the richly diverse experiences of people in later life living with HIV, the book includes a variety of empirical research as well as personal accounts, poetry and other forms of writing from an array of perspectives and academic disciplines. As always with HIV, we find that poverty challenges our notions about the length, expectations and quality of life.

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This volume, third in a series of five on sexuality in later life, brings together the experiences of women, gay men, trans women and hijra from around the world as they describe what it means to live with HIV and navigate the often fraught areas of sex, sexuality, intimacy and relationships in later life. New drug treatments have transformed the lives and expectations of people living with HIV. In this book we hear from people living in Aotearoa New Zealand, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Switzerland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom who are not only living with HIV but also facing stigma imposed on them by others. Too often they have learned to stigmatise themselves. Since no single approach or way of writing can capture the richly diverse experiences of people in later life living with HIV, the book includes a variety of empirical research as well as personal accounts, poetry and other forms of writing from an array of perspectives and academic disciplines. As always with HIV, we find that poverty challenges our notions about the length, expectations and quality of life.

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This volume, third in a series of five on sexuality in later life, brings together the experiences of women, gay men, trans women and hijra from around the world as they describe what it means to live with HIV and navigate the often fraught areas of sex, sexuality, intimacy and relationships in later life. New drug treatments have transformed the lives and expectations of people living with HIV. In this book we hear from people living in Aotearoa New Zealand, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Switzerland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom who are not only living with HIV but also facing stigma imposed on them by others. Too often they have learned to stigmatise themselves. Since no single approach or way of writing can capture the richly diverse experiences of people in later life living with HIV, the book includes a variety of empirical research as well as personal accounts, poetry and other forms of writing from an array of perspectives and academic disciplines. As always with HIV, we find that poverty challenges our notions about the length, expectations and quality of life.

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medical providers is essential, but these researchers found instead that these older women living with HIV were wary of discussing their sexual lives with their physicians. In the United Kingdom and Italy, Cesare Di Feliciantonio interviewed 25 gay men living with HIV who participate in chemsex – that is, the use of drugs such as GHB, GHL, crystal methamphetamine and mephedrone to enhance and facilitate sex. He found that participants framed their engagement with chemsex as driven by the quest for sociality combined with a rediscovery of sexual pleasure and an

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as to not cause contention; we never court controversy.8 Indeed, the mainstream presentation of events is reflected in mainstream preferences of people attending this exhibition. One of the seminars I attended was about chemsex, in which I was one of five people in the audience (in contrast to the standing room-only crowd at the ‘BDSM for beginners’ talk). Chemsex is practised mostly by gay men in clubs, and has levels of risk associated with it that would place it at the outer limit of the kink charmed circle (Bourne et al, 2014). Promiscuous, non

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, understanding and the whole person, more than primarily sex. I am doing well and harnessing my sex work helped me. […] Even as a Male Sex Worker we are a minority within a minority as we don’t have an established voice on our vulnerabilities. Vulnerabilities like sex workers caught up in the ‘chem-sex’ scene [which has become] so popular in the gay community, for medicating the trauma of growing up rejected in a Hetero-centralised world. Or police not seeing violence because it just looks like another case of a gay man overdosing on drugs used in chem sex. Before sex work

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