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159 9 Children One unusual aspect of housework as a job is that it is combined with another job: child-rearer. The majority of housewives have children, and virtually all mothers are housewives. Throughout the previous chapters children have put in brief appearances in the guise of factors affecting the way housewives do their work. Children are mentioned as influencing the enjoyment of par ticular work tasks, for instance, and they appear to make a long working week more likely. They are also cited as a general source of frustration for the housewife as

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115 SIX Saving children Introduction In this chapter we move deeper into the implications of early intervention. We look at the way that brain science and social investment ideas infuse the beliefs of practitioners who work in the early years field. We consider how it shapes their understandings and practices, with consequences for their approaches to and interactions with parents. Practitioners are no mean constituency; the UK has ‘the most elaborate architecture anywhere for parenting support’ (Daly, 2013: 164). There is an extensive workforce involved

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Introduction The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) was adopted in 1989 and is the most highly ratified instrument in human rights law, setting the minimum standards to which children are entitled across their childhood ( Tobin, 2019 ). The Committee on the Rights of the Child (the CRC Committee) has played an important role, interpreting the CRC in its General Comments and helping to improve implementation at a national level through the state party reporting process ( Sloth-Nielsen, 2019 ). Over the years, the CRC’s standards have

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A Social Model

The state is increasingly experienced as both intrusive and neglectful, particularly by those living in poverty, leading to loss of trust and widespread feelings of alienation and disconnection.

Against this tense background, this innovative book argues that child protection policies and practices have become part of the problem, rather than ensuring children’s well-being and safety.

Building on the ideas in the best-selling Re-imagining child protection and drawing together a wide range of social theorists and disciplines, the book:

• Challenges existing notions of child protection, revealing their limits;

• Ensures that the harms children and families experience are explored in a way that acknowledges the social and economic contexts in which they live;

• Explains how the protective capacities within families and communities can be mobilised and practices of co-production adopted;

• Places ethics and human rights at the centre of everyday conversations and practices.

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, 2016 ). The majority of children today are still living with married biological parents (according to the US Census Bureau’s most recent report, approximately 70 per cent in 2018 as compared to 85 per cent in 1968); however, an increasing number of children in the US and UK are living in single-parent, step-family or cohabiting households and experiencing greater family instability ( Fomby, 2011 ; US Census Bureau, 2018 ). In the US, the proportion of children living in single-parent families has grown from 12 per cent in 1970 to 27 per cent in 2018 ( US Census

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This collection of 12 new and revised essays on child care and children’s services, written by leading child welfare historian Roy Parker, draws on his lifetime of research in this area.

By exploring various topics these essays explain significant political, economic, legal and ideological aspects of this history from the mid-1850s. This unique and lasting review of child care services allows readers to understand how the services for some of society’s most vulnerable children have become what they are, how well they have met and now meet the needs of those children.

The collection provides a high-quality, historical reference resource that will inform and capture the interest of social work and social policy students as well as social and legal historians, political scientists and those involved in administration and government, struggling with the issues of the day.

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. The attack by the teens was not an isolated case but was rather one of hundreds of incidents involving Palestinian youth seeking revenge against Israeli civilians subsequent to the 2014 Gaza war and ongoing realities of life under the military occupation. Because so many of the incidents were perpetuated by Palestinian youth lightly armed with scissors, screwdrivers, or knives, the wave of violence during 2015–2016 has often been referred to as the ‘knife’ or the ‘children’s intifada’. Within an internal violent conflict where civilians are not far removed from

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Introduction The argument in this chapter is that children with disabilities need focused attention when children and work are being investigated. Those with disabilities make up a large minority of all children and it is not tenable to ignore them. Currently, they are largely ignored when important issues related to the wellbeing of children are interrogated. It is the exception that data are collected about them and so we cannot usually disaggregate them from the general population and reveal clear evidence about whether they are more disadvantaged than

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Participation at the margins
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Even after 20 years of children’s rights and new thinking about childhood, children are still frequently seen as apolitical. All over the world there has been a growing emphasis on ‘participation’, but much of this is adult-led, and spaces for children’s individual and collective autonomy are limited. “Children, politics and communication” questions many of the conventional ways in which children are perceived.

It focuses on the politics of children’s communication, in two senses: children as political actors, and the micropolitics of children’s interaction with each other and with adults. It looks at how children and young people communicate and engage, how they organise themselves and their lives, and how they deal with conflict in their relationships and the world around them. These are children at the margins, in various ways, but they are not victims; they are finding ways to take charge of their own lives.

The book is also about adults and how they can interact with children and young people in ways that are sensitive to children’s feelings, empowering and supportive of their attempts to be autonomous. With international contributions from a range of disciplines, “Children, politics and communication” is timely and relevant for policy makers, practitioners and researchers engaging with children and young people.

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Introduction Chapter 6 considered the extent to which Oberstown Children Detention Campus has implemented the rights-based model of detention. While noting the progress made in the advancement of children’s rights to child-centred care, provision of need and preparation for leaving, the chapter concluded by noting the potentially transformative effects of fulfilling children’s rights under the themes of participation and partnership. This chapter notes that protection rights are fundamental to children’s rights in detention in two ways. First, they

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