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61 Voluntary Sector Review • vol 6 • no 1 • 61–80 • © Policy Press 2015 • #VSR Print ISSN 2040 8056 • Online ISSN 2040 8064 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204080515X14251102462692 Enhancing service development and service delivery through co-design Busayawan Lam, busayawan.lam@brunel.ac.uk Brunel University, UK Andy Dearden, a.m.dearden@shu.ac.uk Sheffield Hallam University, UK Co-design has the potential to help voluntary organisations deliver better services, since it encourages users to co-create services that will be delivered to them. However, the extent

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key messages User perspectives are argued to increase relevance and use of research evidence. Activities to effect this include: patient and public involvement/engagement (PPIE) qualitative research participatory research, co-design co-production Considerable effort is invested in drawing clear lines along blurred boundaries between them. There may be scope for approaches to work together and peacefully co-exist. Introduction This paper examines different approaches to involving patients and family members in biomedical research

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Key points This chapter disrupts the academy by explaining how the experiences of people with lived experience of suicidal ideation should be considered and addressed in collaborative research on this topic. People with lived experience must have agency and equality with project team members throughout the research and co-design processes, with the same people with lived experience involved throughout. We should be encouraged to share our experiences to challenge traditional research-based and practice paradigms that often fail to legitimise

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Key messages Co-design processes are complex, requiring vulnerability, trust, flexibility, and a willingness to create and sustain change. Innovative co-creation methods can elicit diverse experiences and impact change in services, systems, and policies. Introduction There is a growing international movement towards co-producing evidence and policy change in collaboration with health and social service users (rather than ‘to’, ‘about’, or ‘for’ them) and applying design thinking approaches as a new imperative for health and social system

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85 10 COVID co- design does not *HAVE* to be digital! Why ‘which platform should we use?’ should not be your first question Joe Langley, Niki Wallace, Aaron Davis, Ian Gwilt, Sarah Knowles, Rebecca Partridge, Gemma Wheeler, and Ursula Ankeny Context Physical distancing in response to the global pandemic has posed the challenge of if and how co- design work could continue without face- to- face interactions. One of the authors (SK) set up an open- access online document for researchers to share suggestions about how this challenge could be overcome

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Key messages To bring about meaningful change, evidence-based guidelines need to be implemented in ways that are sensitive to context and the complexity of healthcare. Co-production has the potential to produce better solutions but has its own challenges. Creative co-design can be an effective approach for overcoming these challenges. Introduction In the UK the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) produces clinical guidelines based on the best research available, in order to ensure people receive consistent evidence-based care ( NICE

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157 Policy design as co-design Michaela Howell and Margaret Wilkinson Drawing on an innovative co-design process, facilitated by the contributors, this vignette explores how practitioners have tried to make concrete the theory of co-design. The example highlights the deep challenges this presented to traditional ways of working and thinking. It concludes that a ‘leap of faith’ is sometimes needed for practitioners to see the benefits of unusual co-design processes. The illustrative example is of an attempt to redesign public services in one neighbourhood

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Key messages Creative co-design was perceived to be a successful knowledge mobilisation approach. Creative and visual tools enhanced engagement and innovation. Involving a designer was key and is recommended in co-production projects. Creating a safe space balanced power and voice. Background Getting evidence into practice is challenging. The evidence-based medicine and healthcare movement has tended to view this issue from a positivist perspective expecting that explicit scientific facts can be generated, transferred and used easily in

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39 9 Using experience-Based Co-design to make cancer services more patient- centred Catherine Dale I am writing about my experience as an NHS manager, of using Experience- Based Co-Design (EBCD) to improve the experience that patients have of cancer services in acute hospitals in London. In a nutshell, EBCD collects interviews and observations with patients, creates a short film, and shows this to staff and patients, who then decide collectively which of the issues to tackle. Small working groups of patients and staff form to design and implement

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243 THIRTEEN Co-design with citizens and stakeholders Mark Evans and Nina Terrey What is the magic? That someone bothered to listen. That we were able to plan for our future and make decisions about what works for us. (Family member, ‘Strengthening Services for Families’ project, in Evans, 2013) New methodologies for facilitating meaningful citizen engagement have become increasingly important in a world in which many of the responses to the critical public policy problems we face need to be co-created with citizens and stakeholders. This chapter focuses

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