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A code of conduct sets out the principles which guide police officers’ behaviour. It does not seek to limit officers’ discretion; rather, it aims to demarcate the parameters of conduct within which that discretion should be exercised. However, any breach of the principles enshrined in any code of police conduct may result in action being taken by the organisation and, in serious cases, it could involve dismissal. A code of conduct applies to the conduct of police officers of all ranks while on duty, or while off duty if the conduct is serious enough to indicate

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35 THREE Ethical issues in health and social care research Robert Stanley and Susan McLaren Summary Historically, research has been tainted by incidents of unethical conduct in which vulnerable individuals were harmed. This chapter reviews events that have led to the development of codes of conduct and guidance, together with requirements to conduct ethical reviews of research involving human subjects. An overarching aim of ethical review is to protect the rights, health and well-being of research participants, utilising an approach that is sensitive to diversity

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, and also abide by the code of conduct. The GSCC can remove people from the register if they have reason to do so (examples could include professional misconduct, criminal activity or failure to comply with the code of conduct). With ‘protection of title’ in force from 1 April 2005, only those on the register can call themselves ‘social workers’. This means that for the first time the profession’s governing body has the power to block or remove someone’s professional status and to stop them working as a social worker. This drive to registration within social

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Jan Winiecki* Department of Economics, European University-Viadrina, 15207, Frankfurt - Germany Formal and Informal Rules in Post-Communist Transition Abstract - The article analyzes the extent of the impact that informal rules (customs, beliefs, internalized codes-of-conduct, etc.) may have on the course of post-communist transition from plan to market as they affect die ways individuals react to formal rules of transition. The article is in two major parts. The first deals with the impact of informal rules on behavior in a range of areas (law, morals

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and undertake continuing professional development (CPD) throughout their careers to ensure their knowledge remains up to date. A key attribute of this professional status – arguably one that separates these professionals from businesspersons, construction contractors and tradespersons – is adherence to an ethical code of conduct that requires ‘behaviour and practice beyond the personal moral obligations of an individual’, specifically in ‘respect to the services provided to the public’ ( ACoP, 2003 ). The RTPI Code of Professional Conduct makes explicit that the

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Introduction Professionalism as a concept requires staff and students to behave with integrity during the university experience ( Van der Sluis, Burden & Huet, 2017 ). This theme directly tackles what anti-racist professionalism could be and look like for a university. ‘Professionalism’ is a code ( Sethy, 2018 ). This is true both in its role as a code of conduct, written and unwritten rules for behaviour within a workplace, and as a system of meaning that is designed to include a select group of people while maintaining the illusion of inclusion for all

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of the key issues related to the use of social media in social work practice education. The developments in technology during the early part of the 21st century show no signs of slowing down; indeed, they are more likely to speed up as new technologies are introduced. These developments present vital opportunities to engage with service users at an organisational level to develop social media policies and codes of conduct when using social media generally and, to a certain extent, to engage with individual service users if this is appropriate. However, the

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Although codes of conduct and ethics provide guidance, professionals have to exercise their own judgement in increasingly complex and demanding roles and work contexts when applying them to practice. At times, this can lead to conflict between personal, professional and interprofessional ethics due to the dynamics of the person-centred environment they function in.

This interdisciplinary book draws on the perspectives of 40 authors from four continents to explore the dynamics of ethical dilemmas using theory, research and practice-based examples. Overall, the book will help to spearhead the debate about these ethical dilemmas, and ways of working with them, in an informed manner. It will make ideal reading for students, academics and professionals.

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skills and codes of conduct (social professionals, psychologists, lawyers, doctors and so on). However, it also reflects a series of specific and evolving rules and values: for example, the importance of parents, even where they have been identified as ‘failed’; the rejection of paedophilia; attaching importance to what children say. Cooperation among the different sectors and the coexistence of different standards give rise to misunderstandings and flaws in the system. The research studies partly explain these dysfunctions, and also highlight the potential for new

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that defines their role. Contemporary taxonomies of allied health professions tend to reinforce the notion of the professional project (Larson, 1977 ) by specifying minimum standards, such as required levels of training, continuing professional development, codes of conduct and quality monitoring standards (Health Care Professions Council, no date; Allied Health Aotearoa New Zealand, no date; Allied Health Professions Australia, no date). As we discuss in this chapter, there are few opportunities for support workers to become allied health professionals unless they

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