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Key messages BWCs are able to capture what is ‘visible’, however, coercive control is mostly ‘invisible’. Police officers viewed BWC footage as a way of ‘covering their backs’ in domestic abuse cases, particularly when victim/survivors did not want to pursue a prosecution. This leads to questions as to whose interests are being served by the increased mandatory usage of BWCs in domestic abuse cases. Victim/survivors voiced concerns with how women are able to represent themselves on camera in coercive control cases, often leading to unintended

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Key messages Abusive men’s strategic interference in the mother–child relationship is achieved through: the direct and indirect use and abuse of children, undermining mothers via mother-blaming; exploiting professionals, and capitalising on patriarchal institutions and mother-blaming theories, systems and practices. Recognising this form of abuse as a criminal offence could be addressed using the recent UK coercive control legislation. Introduction Abusive men who use coercive control with women and children can actively interfere in the mother

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Key messages Understanding coercive control at the core of most domestic violence enables better identification and prevention of family situations. Working towards a transformation of social representations in line with the contemporary reality of domestic violence is a fundamental issue in the prevention of domestic violence today for the generations to come. First, this article aims to examine the context in which the representations of ‘domestic violence’ formed in France in the second half of the twentieth century and their contemporary dynamics

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Key messages Children in cases of technology-facilitated parental stalking should be seen as victims/survivors in their own right. The potential for technology-facilitated parental stalking and abuse against children and mothers should be considered in all cases of previous domestic violence/coercive control and parental separation. Introduction This article explores how technology-facilitated parental stalking can harm children’s and young people’s lives. Utilising Finnish court case files, we illuminate how children and young people are exposed to

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key messages Investments in gender norms underpin men’s use of coercive control. Reductions in men’s coercive control is connected to men’s ability to unpick gender norms. This paper provides empirical evidence for keeping gender norms and expectations central in work with violent men. Introduction The perpetration of domestic violence by partners and ex-partners, also known as intimate partner violence, is a complex social problem which, despite its prevalence, is experienced as highly specific, isolating and personalised. Feminist activism

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Key messages Mobile phones are being used by male perpetrators as a tool for coercive control within domestic abuse. While some of the phone-mediated abuse strategies identified in this research correspond with those established through the Duluth model, the Power and Control Wheel does not yet account for the agile technological surveillance that mobile phones afford, which transcends boundaries of physical location. An adapted Power and Control Wheel is presented here that can inform professionals’ assessment and management of risk in the context of

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Key messages Social professionals and society may fail to recognise the covert and gendered power dynamics in post-divorce parental relationships that can be inflicted via coercive control by one parent against the other via the former’s cultivation of hostility of the child(ren) toward the latter, as illustrated in this study. More systematic investigations of the overlooked links between post-divorce coercive control, gender, family history and alienation are needed. Training and improving the knowledgeability of professionals is urgently needed

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Key messages Help-seeking is difficult for victim/survivors of digital coercive control, particularly those who are geographically and socially isolated. In Victoria, the increasing range and availability of technology able to be used to facilitate DCC presents challenges to risk management. There is a pivotal need for ongoing resourcing for the DFV support sector so that they are well-equipped to respond to emerging experiences of DCC among victim/survivors. Introduction Digital technologies are used to perpetrate coercive control in intimate

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201 Families, Relationships and Societies • vol 6 • no 2 • 201–17 • © Policy Press 2017 • #FRS Print ISSN 2046 7435 • Online ISSN 2046 7443 • https://doi.org/10.1332/204674317X14937364476840 Accepted for publication 24 April 2017 • First published online 23 May 2017 article SPECIAL ISSUE • Violence Against Women and Children in Diverse Contexts Domestic abuse and women with ‘no recourse to public funds’: the state’s role in shaping and reinforcing coercive control Rebecca Gail Dudley, rebecca.dudley.dunedin@gmail.com University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

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This is a corrigendum regarding the article by Dijkstra, S. (2023): ‘“I see a wall… then I cannot reach my son.” Coercive control tactics by one parent alienate the child from the other’, Journal of Gender-Based Violence , 7(2): https://doi.org/10.1332/239868021X16481299024267 . The article, published in this issue of the Journal of Gender-Based Violence , has been corrected by the author and journal. The decision is the result of an investigation based on concerns raised by a third party. Potential conflicts of interest were omitted regarding funding from

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