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113 Part 3 Collaboration, conflict and competition

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Congress of Industrial Organizations) prevailed. This decision meant that founding members decided that the best strategy of supporting (non)unionised women was from within the labour movement. In order to do this, they sought to unionise women who had not yet joined trade unions, bringing women into union leadership positions, and by adding women’s issues on the agenda of trade unions. These efforts are characterised by collaboration with other organisations (trade unions, women’s organisations) and conflict within the organisation. Through solving the internal

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Introduction In recent decades, intergovernmentalisation and government externalisation have dramatically increased, resulting in governments adapting to operate effectively within their systems. Networks and collaboration, including interaction between public and private sector organisations, have become essential to the policy process and analysis. Policy analysts thus continuously create and employ various frameworks to extract knowledge from practices. According to Fischer et al (2007 : xix), ‘policy analysis emerged to both better understand the

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ARTICLE Affective collaboration in the Westfjords of Iceland Valdimar J. Halldórsson Museum of Jón Sigurðsson, Hrafnseyri, Iceland ABSTRACT This article advances the need for participatory, affect-based approaches to research through reflection on two projects: the first, concerning the work of a District Committee, the inhabitants of the district and the Municipal Government in the Westfjords of Iceland; the second, a qualitative research project conducted for Red Cross branches in the same area. Anthropologists and ethno- graphers have always practised

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realise that this may sound indulgent, even lazy, but I am endeavouring to talk about how a commitment to social work research and to collaboration with others has worked out for me. I hesitated before taking this on, not only partly because it is not possible to avoid echoing things I have said elsewhere, but also because while relationships with social work and social science colleagues across the world have been a stimulus and indeed a pleasure, I do not think I have given serious thought to what this might mean for the social work community as a whole. Mark Hardy

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This important book examines the role, behaviours and management practices of middle managers operating within the context of collaboration – complex inter-organizational and multi-sector settings that demand cross-boundary governance, policy and practice to tackle challenging contemporary societal problems and issues. Presenting new evidence and offering perspectives from both the public and private sectors, the author critically explores the main themes that are integral to the management challenges facing this cadre of managers. The book sets out the implications of this research for policy and practice and offers practical recommendations to policy makers and managers working in this area.

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Introduction National and international research partnerships are often created by senior staff through tokenism and nepotism, which is highlighted when it comes to topics of authorship and peer review ( Sandström & Hällsten, 2007 ; Silva et al, 2019 ). With the rise of international collaborations as an indicator of research excellence, there is still little attention paid to the continuous inclusion of Black, Asian and minority ethnic academics in the context of research collaborations ( Parker & Kingori, 2016 ). Parker and Kingori also highlight that

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Multinational defence cooperations (MDCs) are rarely created from scratch; rather, they are based on previous collaborations lasting years or even decades. These existing collaborations generate personal networks and institutional relationships between the participating defence policy communities (DPCs), and these accumulate over time, and can help to launch new collaborations. The reason for this is that it is easier to cooperate with someone we know and have established relationships with than with an entirely new partner. Thus, already existing institutions

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391 Policy & Politics • vol 43 • no 3 • 391-406 • © Policy Press 2015 • #PPjnl @policy_politics Print ISSN 0305 5736 • Online ISSN 1470 8442 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/030557315X14357434864543 When collaborative governance scales up: lessons from global public health about compound collaboration Chris Ansell, cansell@berkeley.edu, University of California, Berkeley, USA Global diseases require collaboration at multiple scales – from local to global. This article examines the experience of three international global public health partnerships – UNAIDS, the

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165 TWELVE Wider multi-agency collaborations From the outset this research has contextualised the health interaction between women who experience domestic violence and healthcare professionals within the wider help-seeking activities of the stage one participants. The participating women’s experiences of interactions with other statutory and voluntary agencies was discussed in Chapter Five. This chapter will examine how the participating healthcare practitioners considered their interactions with other non-health professionals. In order to contextualise the

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