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Scale is an overlooked issue in the research on interactive governance. This book takes up the important task of investigating the scalar dimensions of collaborative governance in networks, partnerships, and other interactive arenas and explores the challenges of operating at a single scale, across or at multiple scales and of moving between scales.

First published as a special issue of Policy & Politics, the volume explores the role of scale and scaling in a wide range of policy areas, including employment policy, water management, transportation planning, public health, university governance, artistic markets, child welfare and humanitarian relief. Cases are drawn from Asia, Australia, Europe, and North and South America and span all levels from local to global. Together, the theoretical framework and the empirical case studies sensitize us to the tensions that arise between scales of governance and to the challenges of shifting from one scale of governance to another.

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315 Policy & Politics • vol 43 • no 3 • 315-29 • © Policy Press 2015 • #PPjnl @policy_politics Print ISSN 0305 5736 • Online ISSN 1470 8442 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/030557315X14353344872935 How does collaborative governance scale? Chris Ansell, cansell@berkeley.edu University of California, Berkeley, USA Jacob Torfing, jtor@ruc.dk Roskilde University, Denmark Scale is an overlooked issue in the literature on interactive governance. This special issue investigates the challenges posed by the scale and scaling of network and collaborative forms of

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1 CHAPTER ONE How does collaborative governance scale? Chris Ansell and Jacob Torfing Introduction Although hierarchies and markets continue to play a crucial role in regulating society and the economy and delivering public and private services, collaborative forms of governance are proliferating, fuelled by institutional complexity and political fragmentation and driven by the recognition that no single actor has the knowledge or resources to solve complex societal problems (Kooiman, 1993; 2003). A growing number of studies analyse how collaboration

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Introduction One of the recurring issues in the debates about collaboration of state and non-state actors in public services is whether these new, multi-party forms of governance lead to new and better solutions for societal problems ( Emerson and Nabatchi, 2015 ; Torfing, 2019 ). A great deal is expected from collaborative governance: sharing knowledge, effective coordination, efficient public services and better results. Collaboration allows for the active participation of a broad range of actors with different innovation assets ( Bommert, 2010 ; Hartley

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227 SIX Prostitution policy beyond trafficking: collaborative governance in prostitution The challenges of prostitution policy revisited: harnessing a complex policy field Every policy domain imposes its own specific demands on the politicians and officials who bear responsibility for it. In Chapter Two we delineated five domain-specific challenges that face those officials who are entrusted with regulating prostitution. In Chapter Five we added the general challenge – a challenge that is not specific to prostitution policy, that every policy maker

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Introduction As the introductory chapter explained, collaboration was popularized as an idea across much of the globe in the 1990s and 2000s, including the Global South, and was considerably influenced by international actors and donor non-governmental organizations (NGOs) as well as ideas circulating through nation states about modernizing public governance and management. From the basis of multiple definitions and mixed practices of collaborative governance, this chapter explores trends found through the comparative study of our eight cities, in the

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331 Policy & Politics • vol 43 • no 3 • 331-47 • © Policy Press 2015 • #PPjnl @policy_politics Print ISSN 0305 5736 • Online ISSN 1470 8442 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/030557315X14351553104423 article Governing EU employment policy: does collaborative governance scale up? Eva Sørensen, eva@ruc.dk Roskilde University and University in Nordland, Denmark Peter Triantafillou, triant@ruc.dk Bodil Damgaard, bodam@ruc.dk Roskilde University, Denmark In the European Union (EU), employment policy is a prerogative of the member states. Therefore the EU’s ability to

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21 CHAPTER TWO Governing EU employment policy: does collaborative governance scale up? Eva Sørensen, Peter Triantafillou and Bodil Damgaard Introduction What role does collaborative governance play in transnational governance processes? With few exceptions (Bohman, 2005; Slaughter, 2002; de la Porte and Natali, 2009) the bulk of the collaborative governance literature focuses on local governance (Gray, 1989; Hirst, 1994; Fung and Wright, 2003; Ansell and Gash, 2008). However, an increasing amount of research on multi-level governance in the European Union

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Introduction In complex, shared-power settings, policymakers, administrators and many other decision makers increasingly must engage in collaborative governance in order to effectively address challenging public issues that cannot be handled by single public organisations alone, or even by single sectors ( Gray and Purdy, 2018 ; Innes and Booher, 2018 ). These collaborations must be governed effectively if their public purposes are to be achieved. This paper makes three contributions toward improving the governance of collaborations: first, we argue that a

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Author: Chris Ansell

391 Policy & Politics • vol 43 • no 3 • 391-406 • © Policy Press 2015 • #PPjnl @policy_politics Print ISSN 0305 5736 • Online ISSN 1470 8442 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/030557315X14357434864543 When collaborative governance scales up: lessons from global public health about compound collaboration Chris Ansell, cansell@berkeley.edu, University of California, Berkeley, USA Global diseases require collaboration at multiple scales – from local to global. This article examines the experience of three international global public health partnerships – UNAIDS, the

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