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93 SIX Community development practice in India: Interrogating caste and common sense Mohd. Shahid and Manish K. Jha Introduction A textbook much referred to by social work educators and community development practitioners in India contains the following passage, which reflects on the process of community building in a village near New Delhi, the capital of India: A meeting of all the villagers was called with the help of the student worker. All the male members, especially the adults, were personally requested to attend the meeting. The meeting was

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105 Contact: Dean Herd +1 416 932 3334 deanherd@gosympatico.ca t e Rhetoric and retrenchment: ‘common sense’ welfare reform in Ontario Dean Herd The adoption of the Canadian Health and Social Transfer (CHST) in 1995 signified a dramatic change in the philosophy and practice of welfare in Canada, creating the space for provincial workfare experiments. This article explores the operation of one such experiment – Ontario Works (OW) – which has been hailed as a success in the face of dramatic caseload declines. Rather than a successful welfare to work strategy

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intruder, was his action lawful and did it conform to what would be reasonably expected for self-defence in a situation such as this? In this chapter we will explore the role of ‘common sense’ in influencing answers to the first question and ideas about ‘reasonableness’ in deciding answers to the second. The victim of the shooting was Reeva Steenkamp. She was a 29-year-old model and minor TV celebrity in South Africa, having been raised in Port Elizabeth and later moving to Johannesburg. She met 26-year-old Pistorius at a motor-racing track on 4 November 2012 and they

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187 ELEVEN developments in police education in england and Wales: values, culture and ‘common-sense’ policing Craig Paterson and Ed Pollock introduction The dominant reform agenda of the police service in England and Wales for the last three decades has revolved around the re-emergence of community policing and a languorous cultural shift from ‘rules’ to ‘values’ (Clark, 2005). At the heart of this shift is conflict between a reflective emphasis on the underpinning ‘values’ of policing and a pragmatic emphasis on the common-sense ‘craft’ of police work

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Producing Workers and Immigrants
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This book responds to global tendencies toward increasingly restrictive border controls and populist movements targeting migrants for violence and exclusion. Informed by Marxist theory, it challenges standard narratives about immigration and problematises commonplace distinctions between ‘migrants’ and ‘workers’. Using Britain as a case study, the book examines how these categories have been constructed and mobilised within representations of a ‘migrant crisis’ and a ‘welfare crisis’ to facilitate capitalist exploitation. It uses ideas from grassroots activism to propose alternative understandings of the relationship between borders, migration and class that provide a basis for solidarity.

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Scalecraft and education governance

Succeeding in the art of contemporary policymaking involves designing policies which reflect the deeply interconnected nature of political space. Nevertheless, policy continues to be articulated through age-old categories and hierarchies of scale. This book asks why scale occupies this enduring position of privilege in policymaking, highlighting how scales are far from ‘natural’ features of policy and that they are instead essential to the armoury of policy practice. Drawing on empirical data from the field of education governance, the book traces how scales are crafted and mobilised in policymaking practices, demonstrating that ‘scalecraft’ is key to understanding the production of hegemony.

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uncritical usage. Bolstered by conservative scholarship, the forging of a new ‘common sense’ on welfare may have contributed to the harsh public perceptions referred to in a significant British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey. Problematising the widespread usage of ‘welfare dependency’, the article provides a critical resource for social work educators, practitioners, students and users of services. key words Raymond Williams • Antonio Gramsci • Lawrence Mead • common sense Introduction In exploring ‘welfare dependency’ the discussion is divided into five parts.1 The

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Over the course of the last ten years the issue of debt has become a serious problem that threatens to destroy the global socio-economic system and ruin the everyday lives of millions of people. This collection brings together a range of perspectives of key thinkers on debt to provide a sociological analysis focused upon the social, political, economic, and cultural meanings of indebtedness.

The contributors to the book consider both the lived experience of debt and the more abstract processes of financialisation taking place globally. Showing how debt functions on the level of both macro- and microeconomics, the book also provides a more holistic perspective, with accounts that span sociological, cultural, and economic forms of analysis.

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For several decades, social work and child protection systems have been subject to accelerating cycles of crisis and reform, with each crisis involving intense media and political scrutiny. In understanding the nature and causes of this cycle, little attention has been paid to the importance of collective emotions.

Using a range of cases from the UK, and also considering cases from the Netherlands, the US and New Zealand, this book introduces the concept of emotional politics. It shows how collective emotions, such as anger, shame, fear and disgust, are central to constructions of risk and blame, and are generated and reflected by official documents, politicians and the media. The book considers strategies for challenging these ‘emotional politics’, including identifying models for a more politically engaged stance for the social work profession.

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Intersecting Inequalities in Post-2008 Italian Migration
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This book rethinks meritocracy as a form of coloniality, namely, a social imaginary that reproduces narratives of ethnic and racial difference between European centres and peripheries, and between Europe and its others.

Drawing on interviews with working and middle class, white and Black Italians who moved to Britain after the 2008 economic crisis, the book explores the narratives of Northern meritocracy and Southern backwardness that inform migrants’ motivations for moving abroad, and how these narratives are experienced within classed, racialised and gendered migrations.

Connecting decolonial theory with the sociology of Pierre Bourdieu, this book provides innovative insights into the relationships between meritocracy, coloniality and European whiteness, and into the social stratification of EU migrations.

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