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unprecedented rise (and subsequent fall) in the number of benefit sanctions within the UK (see Chapter Two , the social security system). Discussions in the second part of the chapter then set out the WelCond project’s key findings in relation to the implementation of sanction-backed social security regimes, that is, the universally detrimental impacts on the health, financial and emotional wellbeing of those subject to them. Building on this, the third part offers more detailed discussions of how, and why, compulsion alongside the threat and implementation of benefit

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61 FOUR Local migration cultures: compulsion and sacrifice They had no work in Sanok, neither him, nor her. And the situation simply forced them to migrate. (Aleksandra, explaining why her sister- in-law’s family went to England) (Sanok, 2008) Chapters Two and Three looked at the economic push factors that help explain migration from contemporary Poland. However, decisions to migrate are also influenced by non-economic factors in the sending locality, such as the climate of opinion regarding migration. This climate of opinion can be conceptualised as a

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181 SEVEN Steps to compulsion within British labour market policies Heather Trickey and Robert Walker Introduction Facing an out-of-work population increasingly reliant on social assistance provision, successive British governments over the last 20 years have implemented a range of supply-side labour market policies to tackle unemployment. These demonstrate a trend towards increased use of compulsory activity and, latterly, compulsory work activity, which has come to be an accepted feature of policies directed to unemployed people. The social democratic New

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281 FIFTEEN the criminalisation of intoxication1 Fiona Measham and Karenza Moore there should be safe and enjoyable drinking for the majority, but zero tolerance of the anti-social minority. (Blair, 2004) introduction At the heart of British drug policy lies a prohibitionist stance that prioritises the relationship between drugs and crime, resulting in both increased medicalisation based on outdated notions of addiction and compulsion, and increased criminalisation dominated by ‘war on drugs’ and ‘law and order’ discourses. Medicalisation through the

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and Wiggan, 2017 ; Millar, 2019 ). To investigate these concerns and how mothers respond to the compulsion within the Universal Credit regime, this chapter explores the extent to which mothers experience compulsion through being subject to the welfare conditionality within Universal Credit and how they respond to it over time. This chapter starts by detailing the participants’ work–care choices. It then investigates the extent to which the participants’ Claimant Commitments were negotiated before discussing the participants’ experiences of compulsion over time

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landscapes (our personal matrix). The matrix challenges Eurocentric individualist and separatist orthodoxies. Although Figure 1.1 is an attempt at both operationalising and visualising these multidirectional communications, each so-called level is porous and interpenetrable. As such, they cannot exist independently. Repetition compulsion Repetition compulsion is a concept extracted from classic Freudian theory. Freud saw in repetition one of the most fundamental features of the psyche [ 42 ]. His formulation of repetition compulsion was based on his clinical

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hospital and the community. The large majority of individuals placed on CTOs have been given a primary diagnosis of a psychosis- related disorder, and are on antipsychotic medication (Churchill et al, 2007), which the CTO is intended to ensure they adhere to. Although CTOs are regularly reviewed they can be renewed indefinitely, and so the individuals who are placed on them can be under compulsion in the community for an unlimited period of time. CTOs have spread persistently across different jurisdictions over the last 30 years, and yet remain a much debated

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studies of public/private mixes, this article shows that three umbrella organisations of employers and insurers supported higher state pensions because incremental state regulation of non-state provision over many decades and threats about even greater compulsion in the private sector had significantly reduced company control while increasing their costs. As a result, a higher state pension appeared more attractive to all business actors than further regulation of the private sphere. On this basis, we suggest that state regulation should be incorporated more

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Boundaries, Frames and Perspectives

Designed to support training and CPD in compulsory mental health work, this book looks at assessment, detention, compulsion and coercion in a variety of mental health settings. It focuses on decision making in a variety of professional roles with people from a diversity of backgrounds including contributions from people with lived experience of mental health services. With emphasis on theory into practice, the book is essential reading for those looking to develop their reflexive and critical analytical skills.

Relevant for all professionals making decisions under mental health legislation and those developing, teaching and supporting practitioners in the workplace, it includes:

  • critical reflection techniques;

  • ‘editors’ voice’ features at the start and close of each chapter, summarising key themes.

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97 FOUR The apogee of the temperance movement Introduction The previous chapter identified certain frameworks of moral compulsion that, in addition to purely legal measures, governed the consumption of alcohol under a system established primarily the Licensing Act 1872. This chapter applies the same concern for extra- legal, normative forms of regulation to the period 1914–21. Harrison and Shiman describe how temperance societies were in decline by the turn of the 20th century; memberships were falling and influence was waning.1 Congruously, historians

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