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Introduction The concept of crime is a constant feature of public, media and political discourse in England and Wales. On its most basic level, crime can be defined as behaviour which is prohibited by criminal law and which can be punished by the criminal justice process. Yet crime is in fact a contested and divisive concept. Crime and its meaning can be viewed from a variety of different standpoints: classicist, positivist, constructionist, radical or hybrid. Such standpoints also speak to a range of different audiences for discourses on crime: the legal

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It can be argued that theories of crime and place are the most prolific amongst all genres of criminological theory. As Wilcox and others demonstrate, the variety of place-based theories in criminology span nearly its whole history and include an incredible variety of perspectives. Often associated with the Chicago School of Sociology, the theory of social disorganization was one of the earliest attempts to examine the economic, normative and social milieu of neighbourhoods and variations in levels of crime, especially juvenile delinquency. Subsequent

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PART II Crime and criminal justice

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Fearing Crime, Avoiding Crime 377 Chapter Thirteen Fearing Crime, Avoiding Crime Crime, clearly, is an important element in deciding where to live – or, more potently, where not to live. But overall, crime in London does not turn out to be the issue that most Londoners might imagine. People do not seem over-worried about it, and that is directly related to the fact that – as just seen in Chapter 12 – they know plenty of people in their local area and feel that there is a good sense of community there. But this is not true everywhere: we found a sharp

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over her shoulders whilst she stood with a group of her friends about to board an excursion boat – both were the victims of well-trained and experienced thieves, individuals whose presence is as ubiquitous as the attractions themselves. As Jones, Barclay and Mawby point out ( 2012 ), where there is tourism there will be crime. There should be nothing unusual about that observation, because all human endeavours display examples of deviance and crime. Further, as noted by many scholars interested in the criminological dimensions of tourism (see Sharpley and Stone

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Introduction: crimes of the powerful and the state’s response to COVID-19 The term ‘crimes of the powerful’ is one which is routinely contested within criminological discourse. Historically, criminology has tended not to focus its lens upon crimes of the powerful, whether this be powerful individuals or institutions, and instead has generally focused upon crimes committed by those with little power, such as the ‘street crimes’ of the working classes ( Rothe and Kauzlarich, 2016 ). ‘Partygate’ is emblematic of the influence that power has on how rule

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The term ‘wildlife’ generally refers to animals that live in a wild state outside of human control. In some circumstances it also includes flora as well as fauna. For example, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) includes plants as well as non-human animals in its definition. For present purposes, the main focus will be on non-human animals. For crimes and harms pertaining to plants, refer to literature on threats to biodiversity, the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity and the work of the

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A key resource for students, academics and practitioners, this concise guide brings together various concepts vital to the theoretical, policy and practical debates on forensic psychology and its relationship with crime, policing and policing studies.

Covering issues such as criminal behaviour, police decision-making and crime scene investigation, each entry provides a succinct overview of the topic, together with an evaluation of the emerging issues. The text includes:

  • associated concepts and further reading from research and practice;

  • sample questions;

  • references and glossary.

Accessible and comprehensive, this book is the go-to guide for those getting to grips with the relationships between forensic psychology, crime and policing.

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Defining organized crime in a rural context The consideration of the influence of ‘rural organized crime’ and, indeed, ‘organized crime in the rural’ within the rubric of criminology is polarized and in its infancy. This is not a case of mere semantics but lies at the core of the issue one of the main issues underpinning organized crime in a rural context. Apart from the dearth of literature, there is no clear definition of what constitutes rural organized crime. There are numerous definitions of what constitutes organized crime per se which link the

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defined as a natural transparent liquid that is also colourless, odourless and tasteless. Water is an environmental resource damaged by crime, the object of a crime or the means to commit a crime. Crime is an intentional act or omission (negligence) that constitutes an offence and is punishable by law. Clifford and Edwards (1998) note that an environmental crime is any act that violates the law or an environmental regulation. Environmental crime is an environmental intervention, which is every permanent or temporary act or resigning process which negatively

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