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Crisis is an ambiguous construct – part menace, part hope; open as much to the possibility of catharsis as of catastrophe. Our sense of crisis may be framed by the acute moment of onset, but it is defined by the way we respond – how societies react in the short term, absorbing and distributing impact and, perhaps more importantly, how in the aftermath we learn and adapt. Because the current cluster of calamities is hardly new. It is the contemporary iteration of a long historical timeline. Economic collapse, global pestilence, war – we have been here before

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The essays collected in this special issue of Global Discourse remind us that we live in perpetual crisis. This is a way of indexing the state of human affairs: ‘an age of crisis’, ‘times of crisis’, ‘chronic crisis’ and so on. These expressions seem to merely describe a state of affairs or an experience of time, but they are foundational claims: they are declarations that give structure to amorphous phenomena. In other words, the claim ‘We are in times of crisis’ qualifies history in the ongoing stream of phenomena. The concept of crisis is also a primary

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At the end of his pioneering article on crisis, Reinhart Koselleck (2006 [1972]: 399) makes a disillusioned comment: ‘The concept of crisis, which once had the power to pose unavoidable, harsh and non-negotiable alternatives, has been transformed to fit uncertainties of whatever might be favored at a given moment.’ Not only does he dislike the ‘enormous quantitative expansion in the variety of meanings attached to the concept of crisis’, but he discredits it for the ‘few corresponding gains in either clarity or precision’. In line with his critical approach

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Regulation without enforcement
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UK austerity policies include anti-regulatory pressures to ‘free up’ private capital to produce wealth, employment and tax revenues. This topical book by a recognised scholar on the regulation of corporate crime and social harm considers the economic, political and social consequences of the economic crisis, the nature of social protection and the dynamics of the current crisis of regulation. It is unique in documenting how economic and social welfare are inconsistent with corporate freedom, and in an empirical and theoretical analysis of regulatory reform within the context of wide-scale social change.

Based on empirical research and with a focus on environmental, food, and workplace safety, it considers how we reached the current crisis of anti-regulation and how we might overcome it. The author proposes radically rethinking ‘regulation’ to address conceptual, policy and practical issues, making the book essential reading for those interested in this important topic.

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Key messages Interdisciplinary Crisis Studies is needed as a field of scholarly enquiry to address the multiplicity of crisis. Non-linear approaches are needed to connect across disciplines and address temporality, spatiality and scale. Further, multi-layeredness, processuality and contradictions must be accounted for. Introduction Alarming reports on crises are appearing and being published on a daily basis in different expressions from climate change, to people’s movement and displacement, to armed conflict. Claims to crisis may involve

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understand the possibility and problems that such a condition heralds for polity, politics, and the urban in our present? This book clearly marks out a map of some directions by which we might pursue this question, and more importantly, its stakes. For ultimately, the question of data, urbanism, and technology is one of how do we wish to live in the future? And who even constitutes this ‘we’? What polities (and powers) will be emerging? And what futures are we imagining through and with our technologies? The technosphere The language of crisis by its very definition

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275 Part IV Embedding the crisis intervention approach Introduction to Part IV: The future policy and practice challenge Introduction My overall objective in this book has been to highlight the relevance of community mental health thinking in relation to primary prevention in schools and secondary prevention in the context of the family justice system’s so-called private family law proceedings. In particular, I have drawn attention to this neglected form of early intervention when children are facing critical family change. In Chapter Twelve I

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, notably those who have already paid off their mortgages, and there are now more households who are outright owners than those with mortgages, in part because of an ageing population. But two groups – those on low incomes and those at early stages of their housing careers – continue to lag behind. Furthermore, an increasing proportion of outright owners with high incomes are likely to own a second home, whereas low-income households are unlikely to own even one, widening the dispersion of wealth, which depends heavily on property ownership. The affordability crisis

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Introduction The concept of ‘crisis’ is an important way of thinking about some forms of contemporary social change ( Walby, 2015 ; Bergman-Rosamond et al, 2022 ). It is relevant to social change associated with security ( Buzan et al, 1998 ; Bergman-Rosamond, 2011), climate ( Urry, 2011 ; Hamza and Corendea, 2012 ), migration and refugees ( Gammeltoft-Hansen and Tan, 2016 ), the economy ( Gramsci, 1971 ), and disasters ( Klein, 2007 ; Fassin, 2012 ; Hamza, 2015; Rydstrom, 2020 ). By foregrounding sudden, uneven forms of change, the concept of crisis

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Introduction “There was crisis before, but look at us now!”, Quintino told me. “This thing has augmented it. Nothing to do but suffer, just suffer [ sufri, sufri so ]”, he continued. The ‘thing’ that had amplified the existing hardships was the COVID-19 pandemic – or, more specifically, the economic downturn, travel bans and lack of tourists caused by it. I had not seen Quintino for almost five years, and upon returning to Lisbon in the autumn of 2020, one of the first things on my agenda was to find him and hear how he was faring. The last time we met

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