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, creative work, short films and the Gravel & Sugar documentary Osbomb, love and Supershop: Performing sustainable worlds (2017), can be found on the programme website: www.sheffield.ac.uk/intersection . Note on cross-cultural research Johnson ( 1998 : 1) observes that ‘[i]‌n perhaps no other subfield of social science research are issues of methodology and measurement as open to challenge and criticism as when they are applied in cross-cultural and cross-national settings.’ The INTERSECTION programme’s focus on cities spanning three countries and continents

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Lived Experiences in China, Uganda and the UK

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development makes climate change and responsible consumption key priorities for both industrialized and emerging economies. Moving beyond the Global North, this book uses innovative cross-national and cross-generational research with urban residents in China and Uganda, as well as the UK, to illuminate international debates about building sustainable societies and to examine how different cultures think about past, present and future responsibility for climate change.

The authors explore to what extent different nations see climate change as a domestic issue, whilst looking at local explanatory and blame narratives to consider profound questions of justice between those nations that are more and less responsible for, and vulnerable to, climate change.

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gaining access to families and negotiating informed consent to participate in the study as well as researcher/ researched relations. The chapter then highlights some of the ethical issues raised by cross-cultural research and interviewing respondents about sensitive topics, including the importance of confidentiality and anonymity and the need to manage respondents’ expectations. Finally, the chapter describes the main characteristics of interviewees and the locations for the research, as well as the approach to data analysis and dissemination. research with

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When asking people across diverse geographical and cultural contexts about the impact of climate change on their lives, it is important to take into account how the idea of climate – and thus of climate change – may be differently conceptualised. This chapter explores urban residents’ perceptions of living with a changing climate, the cultural construction of climate change, and how it is conflated with local weather and high-visibility environmental problems such as air pollution, tree felling, industrial waste and changing land use. It discusses how local explanatory narratives differ in their treatment of climate change as remote in space and time or immediate and locally-rooted; and how this affects the extent to which people feel it has a direct impact on their lives. It argues that residents across Jinja, Nanjing and Sheffield were more or less anxious about climate change not only as a consequence of different levels of regional exposure, but also as a result of socioeconomic vulnerability to climate shocks, and the perceived physical deterioration or improvement of their immediate environment as a consequence of urban infrastructural change.

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This chapter situates the INTERSECTION programme of research within wider international debates regarding the relationship between consumption and climate change. It explores how this relationship is addressed in arguments for environmental justice and sustainable development, and how it is reflected in international policy-making. This discussion highlights how climate change is typically cast as both an international and intergenerational injustice, or the convergence of a ‘global storm’ and an ‘intergenerational storm’. This chapter also situates the original contribution of the book within recent social science scholarship that explores how people live with a changing climate, advocating a ‘human sense’ of climate and social change, and outlines the main themes of the subsequent empirical chapters.

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difficulties of cross-cultural research, particularly in the arenas of post-socialist transformation research and migration research. The problem of providing an adequate framework of interpretation for the social phenomena of a culture unfamiliar to the researcher will be captured by the notion of lacking the ‘common sense knowledge of social structures’ (Garfinkel, 1972) of the life world under scrutiny. The database of this study consists of 17 narrative interviews with East German managers who had been economic cadres under socialism and who succeeded in retaining

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Mental Health – Biopsychosocial Factors , Vol 1 , Springer Nature. Broesch , T. and Robbins , E. ( 2023 ) Building a cooperative child: evidence and lessons cross-culturally , Global Discourse , 13 ( 3–4 ): 417 – 30 . doi: 10.1332/20437897Y2023D000000004 Broesch , T. et al ( 2020 ) Navigating cross-cultural research: methodological and ethical considerations , Proceedings of the Royal Society B , 287 ( 1935 ): 20201245 . doi: 10.1098/rspb.2020.1245 Broesch , T. , Carolan , P. , Cebioglu , S. , von Rueden , C. , Boyette , A. , Moya

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often-noted problem in cross-national research is the lack of precision in defining the basis of the comparisons. There can be conceptual and methodological slippage between cross-national and cross-cultural research. These terms are frequently and wrongly seen as synonymous, when, in fact, there is often a poor fit between culture(s) and nation(s) (Denton, 2007; Tung, 2008). The conflation of these terms can lead to an inappropriate generalisation from the unit of observation (that which is measured) to the unit of analysis (that which forms the theoretical

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inequalities as a necessary and important conversation that is part of diversity and 97 INEQUALITIES ON THE MOVE cross-cultural research—any scholarship attending to difference must also attend to the ways such differences are emblematic of historic and ongoing societal power relations between and among different kinds of people. Such power relations often have racial and gender dimensions and the focus in this book has been on race/ethnicity rather than gender. This is an important consideration in that any future scholarship must build on these foundations to

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research?’, Cross-Cultural Research , 33(1), 108–28. Clinard , M.B. and Quinney , R. ( 1973 ) Criminal Behavior Systems. A Typology (2nd edn), New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Coleman , J.W. ( 1987 ) ‘Toward an integrated theory of white-collar crime’, The American Journal of Sociology , 93(2): 406–39. Cooper , T. ( 2006 ) The Responsible Administrator: An Approach to Ethics for the Administrative Role (5th edn), San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Croall , H. ( 2015 ) ‘White collar crime in Europe: afterword’, in J. van Erp, W. Huisman and G. Vande

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