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463 Evidence & Policy • vol 2 • no 3 • 2006 • xx-xx © The Policy Press • 2006 • ISSN 1744 2648 Applying policy and evidence in developing cultural diversity teaching in undergraduate medical education in the UK Nisha Dogra1 and Richard Williams English This ar ticle reports on a study that explored the views of 61 medical education stakeholders about the teaching and learning of cultural diversity in UK medical schools. While a majority of the respondents were familiar with Tomorrow’s doctors, there is little evidence to suggest that it influenced the development

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103 14 Responding to cultural diversity Ram Gidoomal Ram Gidoomal is an author, entrepreneur and former UK group chief executive of the Inlaks Group, a multinational business with 7,000 employees. He and his family were forced to leave wealth and prosperous business interests behind them when they came to Britain from East Africa as refugees. He began his business career in the family corner shop in Shepherds Bush and followed this by spending a short time as an analyst with Lloyds Bank International in the City of London. He was Founder Trustee and Chairman

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469 Families, Relationships and Societies • vol 3 • no 3 • 469–73 • © Policy Press 2014 • #FRS Print ISSN 2046 7435 • Online ISSN 2046 7443 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204674314X14110460471866 Understanding generation through the lens of ethnic and cultural diversity Sharon Wray, s.wray@hud.ac.uk Nafhesa Ali, n.ali2@hud.ac.uk University of Huddersfield, UK The notion of generation is a contested area. It has been used to denote cohort succession, age groups, kinship and historical period. This article will consider the concept of ‘generation’ through the

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Introduction Economic migration flows, accelerated by globalization, have substantially increased the cultural and ethnic diversity of Western societies with high GDP economies. As a large part of these migration flows are motivated by the aspirations of those living in the Global South, or the majority world, to improve their living conditions in more economically prosperous countries, the result in the host societies is not only a substantial increase in ethnic and cultural diversity, but also greater social challenges in accommodating difference as well

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EIGHT Dilemmas of citizenship: tensions between gender equality and cultural diversity in the Danish welfare state Birte Siim The multicultural challenge to gender equality Feminist scholarship has asked important questions about multiculturalism and gender equality and about the relation between women’s rights and respect for cultural diversity. The objective of this chapter is to discuss the challenges from migration and multiculturalism in the context of the Nordic welfare states by looking at the tensions between gender equality and respect for

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, the country has retained this cultural diversity despite suffering multiple waves of colonial subjugation spanning more than three centuries. However, rather than being a source of national pride, the IPs in the Philippines are the most marginalized groups in the country. The continued exclusion and discrimination against ethnic minorities and the long history of their struggle for basic rights are among the most apparent markers of the colonial legacies in the Philippines. “Minoritization” ( Rodil, 1994 ) of IPs in the Philippines began with the Spanish colonial

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193 ELEVEN Corporatist structures and cultural diversity in Sweden Martin Peterson This chapter reviews a period of tumultuous structural change and new sociocultural conditions in Sweden. It begins with the paradigmatic shift of the 1980s away from the Keynesian–corporatist–Fordist epoch and looks at the reinvention of the notion of the not-for-profit ‘social economy’ sector in a Swedish context. Through several cases of different immigrant groups and the ‘host’ population, the chapter explores the relevance and applicability of these changes for individuals

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The challenges of measuring the ethno-cultural diversity of Britain in the new millennium Peter Aspinall English During the next 50 years the ethnic diversity of Britain will increase in response to growing intermarriage, differential rates of natural increase, and continuing migration flows, especially of refugees. While religion is assuming a greater importance in the social identities of some minority ethnic groups, in others it is being displaced by an ethnic focus. In the upcoming decades the increasing sovereignty that people attach to self-identifiers and

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Singapore in 1978; f excluding South Africa; g data for 1954 not available: assumed non-indigenous emigration. NESB: non-English speaking background. Source: Lalich (2004) 213 Developing voluntary community spaces and Ethnicity in Sydney, Australia Dynamic cultural change The arrival of over three million settlers from a non-English speaking background since 1948 has had a major impact on the cultural and social life of Australia. The resultant cultural diversity can be seen in data on language use and religious diversity. In 1996, 734,000 people in Sydney, over five

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example, Martiniello and Rath, 2010; Garcés-Mascareñas and Penninx, 2016). Integration is about ‘imagining what the state can actively do to “nationalize” newcomers and re-constitute the nation-state under conditions of growing cultural diversity’ as Favell (2010, 376–7) has poignantly pointed out. This cultural diversity has become an increasing phenomenon (Faist, 2009) which policymakers in Europe have struggled to come to terms with. The growing diversification of society is particularly evident in cities: places where international migrants mostly settle. An

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