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113 SEVEN dialogical management Government proposes, bureaucracy disposes. And the bureaucracy must dispose of government proposals by dumping them on us. P.J. O’Rourke Any analysis of child welfare needs a discussion about organisation, institutional agency. In line with the rest of this book, this chapter will analyse child welfare agencies from a constructivist point of view. In Chapter Five, the negative evaluations of child welfare were discussed as part of a more overall, neoliberal protest against the welfare state. Administrations were said to

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131 EIGHT dialogical child welfare: conclusion Maybe that’s what writing is all about. Not recording events from the past, but making things happen in the future. Paul Auster In this book, I have discussed the function of dialogue in development, the upbringing of children, child welfare and child welfare organisation. I started from the idea that words –spoken and written – enable people to build up psychological continuity. Words are instruments that give structure to constantly changing life conditions. But this continuity also has a social context

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Author: John Clarke

1 INTRODUCTION ‘Voices in my head’: thinking critically as dialogic practice This book is strange in many ways. It has been a different sort of book to produce and will, I am certain, be a strange book to read. However, it has also been a joy to produce: it features conversations with a dozen leading academic thinkers talking about thinking. The 12 voices contained here are people who have inspired many of us across a range of disciplines and fields, from political theory (Wendy Brown) to social policy (Fiona Williams), and from geography (Wendy Larner

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Author: Emma Wood

terms of levels of confidence, gender, social, economic and ethnic background) and designed a series of dialogic experiences aimed at enabling them to hear and explore a wide range of perspectives about drinking in what dialogue theory terms a ‘safe space’ free from judgement (Bohm, 1996 ). In a current context, the term ‘brave space’ (Arao, 2013 ) seems more apt and to capture Bohm’s intentions more accurately. We were clear that dialogue would only work if we had a range of differing views, so we asked for pupils who were not part of the same friendship groups

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REPLY Carving a dialogical epistemology for investigating altruism: A reply to Mitchell and Eiroa–Orosa Hannah Intezar and Paul Sullivan Sociology and Criminology, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK ABSTRACT This is a reply to Sue Mitchell and Francisco J. Eiroa-Orosa’s ‘Love your enemy.’ The latter seeks to explore the self-transcending potential of altruistic behaviour through a dialogical paradigm. It not only initiates fresh discussion on the subject of altruism, but also advances new discussion on Bakhtinian aesthetics. For the continuation of this forward

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Author: Taku Tamaki

BOOK REVIEW International relations and identity: a dialogical approach, by Xavier Guillaume, London, Routledge, 2011, 192 pp., £26.99 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-138-81174-4 Ever since the flare-up of Sino-Japanese tensions in the summer of 2012, the political debate in Japan has centred on how to maintain, if not enhance, the US–Japan security treaty considered a linchpin of Japanese foreign policy. Another dimension to the ongoing territorial dispute between Japan and China has been the reaffirmation of the perception that Asia remains a dangerous neighbourhood

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Authors: Vicky Duckworth and Rob Smith

travelled. Methodology The project utilised a methodological approach with roots in critical pedagogy (Freire, 1995 ; Breunig, 2005 ). Interviews were framed informally to foster a sense of equality between participants. Research conversations (we reject the term ‘interviews’ because of the connotations it carries of an unequal and unidirectional exchange and distribution of power) were also reciprocal and dialogical as stories were exchanged and opinions and feelings shared. These conversations sought to affirm the positive learning identities that participants

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Author: Chik Collins

six The dialogics of ‘community’: language and identity in a housing scheme in the West of Scotland∗ Chik Collins The language of ‘community’ has a long history in contests over processes of social change. In current contests this language displays a continuing, perhaps even surprising, vitality. The language of community has to be contested because, it seems, it cannot safely be conceded (Collins, 1996a). In practice such contests always take place in contexts which are historical and concrete. Often they are also distinctly local. It is in this

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Thinking Together in Turbulent Times
Author: John Clarke

In this engaging and original book, John Clarke is in conversation with 12 leading scholars about the dynamics of thinking critically in the social sciences. The conversations range across many fields and explore the problems and possibilities of doing critical intellectual work in ways that are responsive to changing conditions.

By emphasising the many voices in play, in conversation with as well as against others, Clarke challenges the individualising myth of the heroic intellectual. He underlines the value of thinking critically, collaboratively and dialogically.

The book also provides access to a sound archive of the original conversations.

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This original edited collection explores the value of public engagement in a wider social science context. Its main themes range from the dialogic character of social science to the pragmatic responses to the managerial policies underpinning the restructuring of Higher Education. The book is organised in three parts: the first encourages the reader to reflect upon the different social and political inflections of public engagement and offers one university example of a social science café in Bristol. The following sections are based upon talks given in the café and are linked by a concern with public engagement and the contribution of social science to a reflexive understanding of the dilemmas and practices of daily life. This highly topical book will be of interest to academics, practitioners and students interested in critical social issues as they impact on their everyday lives.

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