Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 4,053 items for :

  • "domestic violence" x
Clear All

195 Domestic violence and research ethics ELEVEN Domestic violence and research ethics The Domestic Violence Research Group, University of Bristol Hilary Abrahams (HA), Gill Hague (GH), Ellen Malos (EM), Melanie McCarry (MM), Tais Silva (TS) and Emma Williamson (EW) Introduction The Domestic Violence Research Group (DVRG) in the School for Policy Studies at the University of Bristol – re-launched as the Violence Against Women Research Group in September 2004 – conducts national, international and local studies of domestic violence and of other forms of violence

Restricted access
Author:

159 EIGHT ‘Idealising’ domestic violence victims Marian Duggan Introduction Understanding and responding to domestic violence victimisation has long been a contested issue for feminist sociologists, legal theorists, criminologists and victimologists alike. A large part of the discussion has focused on enacting legal protections and redress for victims, which, in turn, has required that dominant myths and stereotypes be challenged in order for victims to be deemed worthy of criminal justice recognition and intervention in the first place. Socio

Restricted access
Author:

79 SIX Definitions of domestic violence, roles and responsibilities This chapter focuses on definitions of domestic violence suggested by stage two participants. This question was asked to ascertain whether any of the healthcare professionals worked to guidelines or a strategic definition of domestic violence. All the stage two participants were asked “How would you define domestic violence?”. Asking this question, in conjunction with questions about the general role of specific healthcare professionals, was intended to examine how participants located

Restricted access
Author:

11 TWO Domestic violence and the medical profession Much of the British domestic violence and health research emanates from localised studies focusing on women’s wider experiences of domestic violence (Pahl, 1985, 1995; Home Office, 1989; McGibbon et al, 1989; Dobash and Dobash, 1992; Hague and Malos, 1993; McWilliams and McKiernan, 1993; Glass, 1995; Mama, 1996; Stanko et al, 1998). Alternatively, research has emerged from health practitioners in North America (Bograd, 1982; Stark and Flitcraft, 1982, 1995, 1996; Goldberg and Tomlanovich, 1984; Klingbeil and

Restricted access
What’s Love Got to Do with It?

Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence

This book provides the first detailed discussion of domestic violence and abuse in same sex relationships, offering a unique comparison between this and domestic violence and abuse experienced by heterosexual women and men. It examines how experiences of domestic violence and abuse may be shaped by gender, sexuality and age, including whether and how victims/survivors seek help, and asks, what’s love got to do with it?

A pioneering methodology, using both quantitative and qualitative research, provides a reliable and valid approach that challenges the heteronormative model in domestic violence research, policy and practice. The authors develops a new framework of analysis – practices of love – to explore empirical data.

Outlining the implications of the research for practice and service development, the book will be of interest to policy makers and practitioners in the field of domestic violence, especially those who provide services for sexual minorities, as well as students and academics interested in issues of domestic and interpersonal violence.

Open access
The response of the medical profession
Author:

Domestic violence and health is one of the first indepth studies within Britain to explore the issue of healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards women who are victims of domestic violence. There is a growing interest by healthcare professionals and researchers about the role of healthcare professionals in relation to domestic violence.

This book looks at the health experiences of women who are victims of domestic violence and the responses to such injuries by healthcare professionals. The author presents the results of an indepth qualitative study, conducted within Britain, examining domestic violence and health. Women who are treated medically without any acknowledgement of the social, personal and psychological aspects of their condition, are likely to re-present with domestic violence-related injuries.

The book includes chapters that look at: current interest both nationally and internationally; why women access health services; an examination of the physical and non-physical effects of domestic violence; the range of treatment options currently favoured by healthcare professionals and the response of patients to them; differentiations in practice between different health professionals; the impact of domestic violence as a social issue on trends in medical training.

These issues are considered in light of debates about medicalisation, the function of the sick role, and both biomedical/wound-led, and holistic/person-led approaches to health provision. Key findings are highlighted, and the author provides recommendations for good practice.

Domestic violence and health is essential reading for public health administrators and policy makers, healthcare professionals and feminist researchers, activists and advocates.

Restricted access
Author:

31 Part One: Domestic violence patients speak out The following three chapters are based on the experiences of women who have experienced domestic violence (stage one participants). They are intended to contextualise the health interaction within the experience of domestic violence and wider help-seeking activities. As such, they address: the impact of physical and non-physical injuries; a variety of treatment experiences; views of the health interaction; and wider experiences of help seeking. It is on the testimonies of these women that Chapters Six to

Restricted access
Author:

121 Domestic violence in Japan SIX Domestic violence in Japan: perceptions and legislation Yoko Shoji Introduction Exposing the problem of domestic violence has been one of the most important and also difficult policy areas that many societies have faced at the end of the 20th century. This is especially so since the special nature of domestic violence is that it is often hidden behind the private relationships between individuals. Now, positioned clearly as an issue on the agenda of the UN, the seriousness of the problem has been recognised in many societies

Restricted access
Author:

53 FOUR Community safety, the family and domestic violence Paula Wilcox For centuries, non-intervention in the private life of the family was the state’s justification for abdicating responsibility for the safety of women and children in the home. With ‘community safety’ becoming a key organising discourse of contemporary crime prevention, this has become an increasingly unsustainable perspective. Feminist research and activism from the 1970s (building on 19th- century feminism [Mill, 1869; Cobbe, 1878]) chipped away at this hegemonic construction of privacy

Restricted access
Author:

33 Journal of Gender-Based Violence • vol 1 • no 1 • 33–44 • © Centre for Gender and Violence Research, University of Bristol • #JGBV • Print ISSN 2398-6808 • Online ISSN 2398-6816 https://doi.org/10.1332/239868017X14896674831496 article Measuring domestic violence: context is everything Andy Myhill, andy.myhill@college.pnn.police.uk College of Policing, London, UK Measurement of domestic violence in population surveys has generated significant debate over a number of years, with researchers and practitioners split over the extent to which violence in

Restricted access