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63 Part Two Equality

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65 THREE Equality The meaning of equality Social inequality is about disadvantage. People are unequal when one has an advantage over another. Advantage and disadvantage are social relationships. People are not said to be disadvantaged because they are worse off, or in a less desirable state than others,122 but because their social relationships make them worse off. For example, if one person has cancer and another does not, that is not inequality; it is a difference in need. The very extensive literature on ‘inequalities in health’ is not about the fact that

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Introduction In this chapter, we will look in more detail at the Universal Model and Partnership Model of providing childcare. We will seek to answer three main questions: 1. What is it about these models of childcare that leads to better gender equality? a) How do the different elements work? b) What are the ideas, institutions and actors that make it work? c) What could make these models of childcare not work to improve gender equality? 2. What aspects of these models of childcare could be transferred to other national contexts? a) What

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99 FOUR Towards equality In Chapter Two I considered some of the elements of a ‘free society’. It is more difficult to represent the elements of an ‘equal society’, because the range of understandings is much wider. Equality covers a range of different concerns and aspirations; it embraces several discrete approaches, such as equality of persons, equality of rights and equality of welfare; and different forms of equality are achievable through a wide range of different methods. Policies for equality Equality of treatment There are five main types of policy for

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A vision for social justice
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In an era of ongoing economic failures, as governments cut support to the poorest, the richest continue to get richer and those in-between are squeezed by rising costs and flagging incomes, the challenges for social cohesion – and for social justice – seem overwhelming. As inequality increases, it can become harder to empathise with life experiences far removed from our own, particularly when fuelled by a sense of injustice. Our samenesses and our differences can remain unseen, unvalued or misunderstood.

In this ambitious, wide-ranging book, the author sets out a vision for social justice as ‘inclusive equality’, where barriers to equality and inclusion are removed to the maximum extent possible while preserving and strengthening social cohesion. Weaving together themes from the theoretical literatures on social justice, poverty, discrimination and social exclusion, she explores relationships between equality, diversity and inclusion - a novel approach that reveals clear, practical implications for the design and delivery of social policy.

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Chapter objectives Over the past decades, equality has become an increasingly important concern. Since the mid-20th century, a growing number of legal regulations aim to abolish discrimination and promote equality. This chapter shows that while equality has gained increasing importance over the past few decades, inequalities persist. Starting first with the distinction between equality of outcome and equality of opportunity, and secondly between formal and substantial equality, this chapter highlights that different understandings of the term equality exist

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1 Human rights and equality in education: Introduction Sandra Fredman, Meghan Campbell and Helen Taylor Education is at the heart of the global struggle to alleviate poverty and reduce inequality. It has been demonstrated that one extra year of education is associated with a reduction in inequality (as measured by the Gini coefficient) of 1.4 percentage points.1 Yet it is precisely the most disadvantaged who face the greatest obstacles to accessing quality education. Although some progress has been made in recent decades, there were still as many as 57

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127 Equality and human rights: siblings or just rivals? Trevor Phillips This article is based on a speech given at the social Justice and Public Policy conference on 6 December 2006 in London. The author was until recently Chair of the Commission of Racial Equality and has now been appointed as Chair of the new Commission for Equality and Human Rights in Britain. The article sets out his views on the relationship between equality and human rights. It argues that choices need to be made in politics and public policy in managing tensions between diverse

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International Best Practice in Childcare and Long-term Care Policy

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. Drawing on comparative research from five countries, What Works in Improving Gender Equality provides an accessible analysis of what gender equality means and how we can achieve it by adapting best practices in care policies from other countries.

Realistic policy solutions are reached by examining the contexts in which childcare and longterm care policies are developed, and what difficulties might need to be overcome in applying the lessons from different international models.

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Introduction In this chapter, we will look in more detail at the Universal and Partnership Models of providing long-term care. We will seek to answer three main questions: 1. What is it about these models of long-term care policy that leads to better gender equality? a. How do the different elements work? b. What are the ideas, institutions, and actors that make it work? c. What could make these models not work to improve gender equality? 2. What aspects of these models could be transferred to other national contexts? a. What do we know

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