Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,287 items for :

  • "expectancy" x
Clear All
Author:

272 29 Life expectancy: women now on top everywhere Barford, A. Dorling, D., Davey Smith, G. and Shaw, M. (2006) ‘Editorial: Women’s life expectancy’, British Medical Journal, vol 332, pp 1095-6. During 2006, even in the poorest countries, women can expect to outlive men. Women who seek to be equal with men lack ambition. (Timothy Leary, 1920–96) The year 2006 should not be allowed to pass without at least a quiet celebration that this is the first year in human history when—across almost all the world—women can expect to enjoy a longer life expectancy than

Restricted access
Author:

153 12 Time for a smoke: one cigarette is equivalent to 11 minutes of life expectancy1 Shaw, M., Mitchell, R. and Dorling, D. (2000) ‘Time for a smoke: one cigarette is equivalent to 11 minutes of life expectancy’, British Medical Journal, vol 320, p 53. Editor—Studies investigating the impact on mortality of socioeconomic and lifestyle factors such as smoking tend to report death rates, death rate ratios, odds ratios, or the chances of smokers reaching different ages. These findings may also be converted into differences in life expectancy. We estimated how

Restricted access
Author:

333 42 The fading of the dream: widening inequalities in life expectancy in America International Journal of Epidemiology (2006) vol 35, no 4, pp 979–80 ‘Oh give me a home, where the buffalo roam and the deer and the antelope play Where seldom is heard a discouraging word And the skies are not cloudy all day.’ [Popular Cowboy Song, undated, verse] Studies of health inequalities in the United States are relatively rare, especially considering the extent of those inequalities in comparison with other countries;1 the population size of the United States in

Restricted access
Author:

265 28 Global inequality of life expectancy due to AIDS Dorling, D., Shaw, M. and Davey Smith, G. (2006) ‘HIV and global health: global inequality of life expectancy due to AIDS’, British Medical Journal, vol 32, pp 662-4. Summary points • Inequality in mortality between continents reflects the inequality in gross domestic product per capita. • Inequality of health and wealth between continents began to rise in the early 1980s. • Africa has been most affected by the widening global inequality in mortality, probably as a result of the AIDS pandemic

Restricted access
Author:

actors – developers and corporations – to demonstrate the ‘public purpose’ and ‘economic impact’ of their prospective projects, which often leads to the transmission of public land and financial subsidies for development. In this sense, consultants are one of the strategic bridging agents between state and economy, providing the glue that has allowed myriad public–private partnerships to flourish (Weber and O’Neill-Kohl, 2013 ). In this chapter I will discuss how the anticipatory gaze – what some call ‘expectancy’ – is formalised in the tools and techniques used

Restricted access
Author:

is on the data on life expectancy and on mortality and morbidity rates, and on the implications of these as a basis for policy making on health and care. It sets the scene for the discussion in subsequent chapters. Since policies both influence and are influenced by the data, a critical approach is necessary which questions approaches to information gathering and interpretation as well as analysing the basis on which policy priorities are established. The production of information on ageing, health and care is influenced by a range of factors: practical

Restricted access

and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or disability’ (WHO 1948), is important as it requires us to take into 124 Ageing in the Mediterranean consideration the many and varied socioeconomic and cultural factors that have an impact on health and, with special reference to older people, on healthy life expectancy (HLE). It also introduces the critical dimension of wellbeing and quality of life in old age, so that importance is given not only to living longer, but also to living better. The WHO Millennium Declaration and its Millennium Goals

Restricted access
Author:

IntroductIon social medicine: Polarisation and perspectives This is the second of three short ‘Policy Press bytes’, taken from a much longer book (Dorling, 2013) on unequal health. The chapters extracted here aim to illustrate how closely connected medicine and politics are – more so now than ever. Politicians have their health targets. The last (New Labour) government announced at the start of its first period of office that reducing the polarisation of health outcomes was its most important goal. One of its targets was to reduce life expectancy differences

Restricted access
Author:

209 27 The super-rich are still soaring away1 New Statesman (2010) April …It is not sustainable for social inequality to continue to rise at its current rate… Has anyone noticed that this week we entered the end of times? You know, when the impossible begins to happen: all that is solid turns into dust - that kind of thing? There had been signs for some time. Things began to happen that simply could not continue. Take immortality for a start. The most recent figures for life expectancy in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea saw life expectancy rise

Restricted access

from a series of large prospective studies.1,2 Income inequality within a population has also been suggested to be an important determinant of population mortality. In a cross-national comparison, Rodgers found associations between income inequality and three mortality indicators – infant mortality, life expectancy at birth, and life expectancy at age five – after taking overall gross national product into account.3 Several replications of this, across both a wide range of countries and within industrialised nations alone, using a variety of health indicators, have

Restricted access