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73 Part Two: Children, families and relationships Children – our future! The last decade has witnessed a growth in the amount of policy and service initiatives aimed at supporting the health and well-being of children and their families. Much of this work has been based on the assumption that offering a child as good an upbringing as possible has positive outcomes for the child, their family, their community and governments and society in general. The rights of the child have also received welcome attention with wider debates on balancing child and parental

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19 Part One: Families in society The first part of this book is concerned with how families engage with organisations and services as they seek to combine caring, working, training and education. Issues relating to the broad themes of family life and working life have received much attention in recent decades. Governments, employers’ organisations, trades unions and professional associations, along with a range of voluntary sector agencies and groups, have considered a range of policy and practice ideas to support families with children and other car ing

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Boundaries and relationships

Acknowledging the increasing diversity and complexity of families, this innovative book proposes a new conceptual framework for understanding families and other relationships that both challenges and attempts to reconcile traditional and contemporary approaches.

Using the notion of ‘boundaries’, the book shifts thinking from ‘families as entities’ to ‘families as relationship processes’. Emphasising the processes that underlie boundary construction and reconstruction suggests that the key to understanding family life is the process of relationship formation. The ideas of entity, boundary, margins and hybridity provide a framework for understanding the diverse, and often contradictory, ways in which families contribute to society.

Families in society makes a significant contribution to the academic literature on families and is essential reading for social science students, social researchers, policy makers and practitioners interested in families and relationships.

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Families play a key role in the transmission of unfair and unearned advantage and disadvantage. The nature and position of the family a child is born into makes a substantial difference to their life chances. ( Calder, 2018 : 424) Introduction This chapter takes a critically informed look at the role of families, and children’s position within families, in understanding child poverty and disadvantage. The chapter begins by demonstrating that family life under conditions of disadvantage tends to be pathologised and denigrated: parents who are ‘poor’ are

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Childhood and poverty in urban neighbourhoods

Family life in areas of concentrated poverty and social problems is undermined by surrounding conditions. This timely book, by acclaimed author Anne Power and her team, is based on a unique longitudinal study of over 200 families interviewed annually over the last decade. It examines the initiatives introduced to help such families and the impacts on them, their future prospects and the implications for policy. Accessibly written and with clear data presentation, the book will have wide appeal to people who work with, live in and care about families, children and low-income areas.

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Practices of Care by Nannies, Au Pairs, Parents and Children in Sweden
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Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence

Paying privately for childcare is a growing phenomenon worldwide, a trend mirrored in Sweden despite the prevalence there of publicly funded daycare. This book combines theories of family practices, care and childhood studies with the personal perspectives of nannies, au pairs, parents and children to provide new understandings of what constitutes care in nanny families.

The authors investigate the ways in which all the participants experience the caring situation, and expose the possibilities and problems of nanny and au pair care. Their study illuminates the ways in which paid domestic care workers 'do' family and care; in doing so, it contributes to wider political and scientific discussions of inequalities at the global and local level, reproduced in and between families, in the context of rapidly changing welfare states.

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Part One Introducing Family Group Conferences

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97 Part Three Health and families Families are important entities in shaping the health of their members. Historically, families were the major source of medical care (see Chapter Two) and, with the increase in chronic illnesses, much medical caregiving has been transferred back to families. But the impact of families on health extends far beyond caring for the sick: the family is the oldest social institution in existence and evolved to enhance the survival of its members, usually by organizing work, reproduction, and sexuality. Modern families

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169 NINE Rationalising family intervention projects Sadie Parr and Judy Nixon introduction As part of New Labour’s drive to tackle anti-social behaviour, in January 2006 the government launched a ‘new approach to the most challenging families’ involving a national roll-out of 53 ‘Family Intervention Projects’ (FIPs) (Respect Task Force, 2006a). This latest anti-social behaviour policy initiative, more commonly (and rather unhelpfully) referred to by the media as ‘sin bins’, provides families who are homeless or at risk of eviction (usually from social

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Part Two Family Group Conferences in Practice

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