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familiar tales of Greenham, of Greenham hagiography, rather than still hungry for every crumb? In a book on feminist peace camps, Greenham is a touchstone – but it is necessary to make the point here about how unusual this is, how long it has taken for a book where Greenham almost, just almost, needs to be knocked off its pedestal. Greenham should be done to death, but it is not. Stories of Greenham remain a site of feminist archive fever for some of us, because we are so far from the endless repetition of Greenham that we might expect. There is still so much more to

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this introduction and the endnotes, lies with us (Catherine and Alison). We have tried to push ourselves into the background of the conversation that follows, to leave as much space as possible for Rebecca, Vanessa, Ray and Kate. However, it remains the case that our specific preoccupations – Catherine’s with the politics and representation of protest camps in the UK, and particularly of Greenham, and Alison’s with feminist archiving and with the intertwining of academic and cultural feminist interventions – shape what follows. The conversation begins with Rebecca

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under-recognised element of contemporary feminist mobilisation, in many contexts around the world and that acknowledging them can complicate well-established narratives – what Moore, in Chapter 13 , calls ‘cultural memories’ about feminism – as well as making new contributions to feminist archiving. We begin by examining how protest camp involvement fits in wider discourses about feminist movement. For many years, the dominant narratives about feminism in the West have focused not on the street, park and square but rather on demobilisation, in the form of

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( Hurwitz, 2019b ), women and feminists have often been marginalised within broader movements. In this chapter, we explore the invisibility of women and feminists of different genders, races/ethnicities, and sexualities in the US Occupy movement and reveal the feminist archiving practices that are required to recognise and analyse their substantial contributions. In autumn 2011, activists in New York City and San Francisco, including some feminists, joined the global wave of pro-democracy protests by founding the Occupy movement. What began in New York City on 17

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the feminist archives – which are cared for in Bristol University’s Special Collection– continued to physically connect me to these histories. The perspectives of socialist feminists featured very little in my doctoral training, and I seem to remember them being regularly dismissed as simplistic and out-of-date. Whether it was the ‘fault’ of post-structural feminism or Bourdieu’s hold on British sociology, political economy simply would not have been on my radar if it had not been for meeting these women or visiting the feminist archives in Bristol University

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20th Century – Archive and Research Centre Ireland: The Irish Qualitative Data Archive, Irish Social Science Data Archive (ISSDA) Lithuania: The Lithuanian Data Archive for Social Sciences and Humanities (LiDA) Northern Ireland: The Northern Ireland Qualitative Archive Poland: Archiwum Danych Jakościowych Slovenia: Archiv Druzboslvnih Podatkov Switzerland: The DARIS (Data and Research Information Services) The Feminist Archive North –_ https://feministarchivenorth.org.uk The Feminist Archive South –_ http://feministarchivesouth.org.uk/ Henry A

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Entanglements, Critiques and Re-Imaginings

This ground-breaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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with wonderful reproductions of posters, leaflets, memories, campaign publicity, women’s movement ephemera and buttons worn. An important paper by Jill Radford (1994) is ‘History of the Women’s Liberation Movement in Britain: a reflective personal history’. And a helpful 1990 book, edited by Michelene Wandor, is Once a feminist: Stories from a generation . But these are just a few. 30 For further references (a selection of many), see the endnotes. Historical archival resources are available from Feminist Archive North based in Leeds, and Feminist Archive South

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, this wibbly-wobblyness of the sharedness of the meaning, that holds people together who have different understandings of the archive. In using the idea of boundary object here, I am developing and extending work on community archiving. This particularly includes work initiated by Andrew Flinn and colleagues on community archives, as well as those writing on feminist archival practices (Flinn, 2007; Flinn et al, 2009; Eichhorn, 2010, 2013; Stevens et al, 2010) and work on post-custodialism, including Terry Cook’s account of four archival paradigms, which

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Trade Unions and Gender Inequality in the British Film and Television Industries
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Frances C. Galt explores the role of trade unions and women’s activism in the British film and television industries in this important contribution to debates around gender inequality.

The book traces the influence of the union for technicians and other behind-the-camera workers and examines the relationship between gender and class in the labour movement. Drawing on previously unseen archival material and oral history interviews with activists, it casts new light on women’s experiences of union participation and feminism over nine decades. As concerns about the gender pay gap, women’s rights and harassment continue, it assesses historical progress and points the way to further change in film and TV.

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