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Rule keeps critique in fragmentation. In the specific case of open global governance, a constellation in which critique is endorsed and invited in, instead of crushed, I have argued that this happens in a complex way, critique fragmenting without being exposed to repression. Yet how exactly does that work, given that global governance is not a sovereign state but a conglomerate of heterogeneous institutions? For examining such a how -question, process tracing offers itself as an adequate technique of inquiry. Process tracing is rather a framework for

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Key messages This article aims to understand the fragmentation in the global cybersecurity governance from an IPE perspective. The cybersecurity is assumed to be a ‘quasi-international public good’. Fragmentation is caused by the imbalance between supply and demand of this quasi-international public good. This imbalance can be understood from two aspects: supplier’s motivation and consumer’s selection criteria. Introduction With the rapid advancement of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, cyberspace has become a catalyst for global economic and

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Key messages Regulatory fragmentation effects can negatively affect cybersecurity including human resources, despite economic benefits. System decoupling does not equate to improved cybersecurity and can even decrease it at the global level. Shared global IT infrastructures and markets have restraining properties, contrary to the now dominant theory of ‘weaponized interdependence’. Introduction 1 , 2 Governments around the world have increasingly become aware of the cost of data being transferred outside of their jurisdictions, such as potential

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Attending the World Bank Group/IMF Civil Society Policy Forum, I observed in abundance the institutional practices that contribute to the fragmentation of critique. This is probably not surprising to any critical theorist or activist who has spent a while thinking through the problematic consequences of participation. 1 What may be more surprising, and more illuminating for the guiding question of this book, is how the practices of critique change throughout this institutional interaction. As in the case study of the EIR ( Chapter 7 ), I will now go on to

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and empower rebellious forces within civil society. This chapter returns to the problem of containment, de-mobilisation and fragmentation, dimensions of urban governance that mitigate against both antagonistic and constructive forms of resistance. This endeavour casts light on a number of issues: first, the means by which urban regimes contain and enclose resistance, and insulate themselves from potential impacts; second, the chilling and divisive effects of social partnership traditions; third, structural and institutional limitations on regime transition through

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Introduction Several researchers engaged in rural areas as a site for crime and policing have stated that this combination of the themes of coherence and fragmentation has not undergone as careful investigation as many other social or economic processes prevalent in the rural ( Hayward, 2012 ; Mawby and Yarwood, 2016 ). Those who usually provide society with knowledge of rural living conditions – often geographers or sociologists – have to a lesser extent paid attention to rural localities and contemporary transformation in relation to crime and policing

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Policy & Politics vol 31 no 4 351 Key words: rural development partnerships • sectarianism • Northern Ireland Final submission 12 October 2003 • Acceptance 5 November 2003 © The Policy Press, 2004 • ISSN 0305 5736 Policy & Politics v 32 n 3 351–69 Addressing fragmentation and social exclusion through community involvement in rural regeneration partnerships: evidence from the Northern Ireland experience Arthur P. Williamson, Rona S. Beattie and Stephen P. Osborne English This article considers the role of community and voluntary organisations in promoting

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discussions. To hold up my hypothesis that the governing mechanisms are instantiated by institutional as well as resistant practices, we should be able to observe how, through the course of events, parts of the critics accepted a neoliberal governing rationality, while others delineated themselves from this economized logic, in effect creating fragmentation among critics. The economization of critique in the form of accepting a neoliberal governing rationality was a core pattern during the EIR, specifically in the adoption of economic and technical language by critics. A

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233 ELEVEN From government fragmentation to local governance: welfare reforms and lost opportunities in Italy Yuri Kazepov and Angela Genova1 This chapter discusses the impact of new forms of local governance emerging in Italy as a result of welfare reforms that took place from 1990 to 2004. Particular attention is devoted to activation policies – policies aimed at combating the social exclusion of people in a condition of economic and social need by empowering or obligating individuals to attain autonomy from welfare dependency. These policies have been chosen

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249 Fragmentation and competition: voluntary organisations’ experiences of support for family carers Jo Moriarty, jo.moriarty@kcl.ac.uk Jill Manthorpe, jill.manthorpe@kcl.ac.uk King’s College London, UK In England, voluntary organisations such as the Carers Trust and Alzheimer’s Society play major roles in providing practical help and support to family carers. This article draws on a large study looking at social care practice with carers to illustrate how changes in social care commissioning and cuts in funding have created difficulties for

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