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Fraud is a global issue. Whilst not new, technology has driven an exponential increase in the ability of offenders to target victims universally, including those in a rural context. Smartphones and other internet-connected devices have driven many positive developments across our everyday lives. However, it also increases exposure to fraud, usually targeting victims from outside their own jurisdiction. A background to fraud As described by Button and Cross (2017) , fraud can be defined as the use of deception to gain a financial advantage. Synonymous

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199 Chris Grover Lecturer Department of Applied Social Science Lancaster University Bailrigg Lancaster LA1 4YL UK +44 (0)1524 594122 +44 (0)1524 592475 c.grover@lancaster.ac.uk www.lancs.ac.uk/fss/ apsocsci/staff/grover.htm t f e w Advertising social security fraud Chris Grover This article analyses the representation of social security fraud in the UK’s Department for Work and Pensions’ (DWP) television advertising campaign between 2000 and 2004. The article discusses the campaign in the context of New Labour’s concerns with social security fraud and observes

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241 Chapter 24 Fraud and abuse The idea that large sums of money are wasted through fraud and abuse is exaggerated. Official estimates, based on survey evidence, combine figures for fraud, claimant error and official error; overpayments attributable to claimants tend to reflect the complexity of the benefits system as much as any deliberate action. However, the pursuit of fraud has had a major effect on the way that the system operates. One of the factors that is most often identified as the reason for inflated costs is the problem of abuse. Fraud is, in

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Key questions 1. Does the rise of online fraud and extortion indicate increased risk or simply the migration of already existing forms of crime to online domains? Or is this rise just the consequence of economic growth, particularly in intangible goods? 2. What is identity and what does the concept of identity theft tell us about the relationship between identity and identification in a digital age? 3. Why is digital encryption so secure in some domains but so weak in others? 4. What is the relationship between social engineering (persuading people

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, potentially compensated by migration, which poses a different set of soluble problems. The Economist described the financial sector as mired in ‘a culture of casual dishonesty’. 4 That culture denies the imperatives of sustainability and population growth as well as social harmony, which are commonly excluded from political-economic consideration. But the culture does accept fines for fraud and criminality, simply as the cost of doing ‘business as usual’. In the aftermath of the infamous Forex trading scandal, which involved banks colluding for at least a decade to

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159 10 Regulating food fraud: Public and private law responses in the EU, Italy and the Netherlands Antonia Corini and Bernd van der Meulen Introduction The horsemeat scandal in 2013 brought food fraud to the attention of both the public and authorities in the European Union (EU). ‘Food fraud’ is used to indicate a wide variety of violations of food law, such as the use of non-authorised ingredients, adulteration of food substances, and irregular labelling or counterfeiting of geographical indications. Such violations may affect consumers’ economic

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243 THIRTEEN Denying victim status to online fraud victims: the challenges of being a ‘non-ideal victim’ Cassandra Cross Introduction Victimhood is a contested space. Far from being a fixed category, ‘the “victim” label is contingent and complex, shifting frequently according to social practices, race, gender, and class relations’ (Spalek, 2006: 31). Not all persons who experience harm and trauma associated with criminal acts will see themselves as victims or be afforded victim status. Similar to crime, victims can ‘be seen as social categories’ (Sanders

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219 ELEVEN Jumping the queue? How a focus on health tourism as benefit fraud misses much of the medical tourism story Daniel Horsfall and Ricardo Pagan Introduction Medical tourism is a multi-billion pound industry that has seen substantial growth over the last 15 years (Horsfall and Lunt, 2015a). As a process it has been the focus of wide-ranging, business, political, academic and, intermittently, media interest. Early media references to medical tourism were often either to highlight the novelty of travel as an option for those seeking care (BBC, 2004

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; Tyler, 2013 ). This coincides with politicians and media sources decrying hidden economy activity and benefit fraud as crimes which are rampant, costing states millions and in need of serious clampdown ( Gantchev, 2019 ; Headworth, 2019 ). With a focus on the disciplinary turn, which is evident in contemporary labour market and welfare policies, the construction of persons in receipt of welfare payments as a suspect criminal population is a key theme in this chapter. In the first part of the chapter, the focus is on labour market activation and welfare

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institutionalised ( Bradt and Bouverne-De Bie, 2009 ; Rogowski, 2018 ), which challenges the core values of social work. This impacts upon the individuals working within social work, leading to value conflicts, professional identity fractures and the imposter phenomenon (IP). IP (also known as imposter syndrome) can be summarised as the inability to internally attribute success ( Clance, 1985b ). Identified by Clance and Imes ( 1978 ), IP means that professionals who are both qualified and competent do not recognise this within themselves and feel like frauds or fakes within

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