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Introduction At the heart of this chapter are the stories of 11 gay men, aged 43–71, who spoke about adventurous sexual encounters with strangers. It would be an exaggeration to say that they structured their lives around casual sex but, as their stories show, they were willing and able to make time available to maximise opportunities for sexual adventures. Analysis of the stories revealed two narratives. The first was the effect of age on their ability to satisfy their sexual desire, that is, whether or how an ageing body constrained their sexual activity

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97 ar tic le 6 Key words gay ageism • ageing capital • differentiation • technologies of the self • friendship family © The Policy Press • 2013 • ISSN 2046 7435 Families, Relationships and Societies • vol 2 • no 1 • 2013 • 97–113 http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204674313X664716 Differentiating the self: the kinship practices of middle-aged gay men in Manchester Paul Simpson Middle-aged gay men in Manchester differentiate themselves through accounts of ‘friendship family’ from relating/kinship associated with heterosexuals and younger gay men. In this article

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159 NINE A theoretical model for intervening in complex sexual behaviours: sexual desires, pleasures and passion – La Pasión – of Spanish-speaking gay men in Canada Gerardo Betancourt VIGNETTE Carlos, a Latino Colombian gay man, came to the first session of Chicos Net, an HIV prevention behavioural intervention. He has lived in Canada for the past four years. During the process, he told the group that he had unprotected sex the week before. His reasoning was based on how much he was attracted to the guy he had sex with, and that he was so ‘into’ the

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chapter focuses on an underexplored dimension within the social science literature on chemsex: ageing with HIV. Even though public health literature, service providers and practitioners usually refer to those aged over 50 when discussing ‘ageing with HIV’, this chapter slightly expands that definition in an analysis of the relationship between the life course and engagement with chemsex in the narratives of self-identified gay men living with HIV aged over 45 – a group usually referred to as ‘midlife’ ( Simpson, 2013 ) – who practise chemsex in England and Italy. From a

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231 ELEVEN Making space for fatherhood in gay men’s lives in Norway1 Arnfinn J. Andersen Introduction The chapters in this book provide evidence as to how the construction of fatherhood is undergoing changes as a result of closer and more independent relations between fathers and children. This also affects gay men and their prospects for and realisation of fatherhood. Norms pertaining to fatherhood (and parenthood) are changing along with the political struggle among gays and lesbians for greater acceptance and recognition, including parenthood. What

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191 TWELVE Health and well-being of lesbians, gay men and bisexual people in later life: examining the commonalities and differences from quantitative research Mark Hughes Introduction While the complexities and intersections of age, gender and sexualities can be difficult to capture in quantitative studies, findings from quantitative research do relate to majority experiences and general patterns within populations, and hence are important sources of knowledge. However, with the frequent aggregation of people into one LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual

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Following the development of anti-retroviral therapies (ARVs), many people affected by HIV in the 1980s and 1990s have now been living with the condition for decades.

Drawing on perspectives from leading scholars in Bangladesh, Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Switzerland, Ukraine, the UK and the US, as well as research from India and Kenya, this book explores the experiences of sex and sexuality in individuals and groups living with HIV in later life (50+). Contributions consider the impacts of stigma, barriers to intimacy, physiological sequelae, long-term care, undetectability, pleasure and biomedical prevention (TasP and PrEP).

With increasing global availability of ARVs and ageing populations, this book offers essential future directions, practical applications and implications for both policy and research.

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What’s Love Got to Do with It?

Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence

This book provides the first detailed discussion of domestic violence and abuse in same sex relationships, offering a unique comparison between this and domestic violence and abuse experienced by heterosexual women and men. It examines how experiences of domestic violence and abuse may be shaped by gender, sexuality and age, including whether and how victims/survivors seek help, and asks, what’s love got to do with it?

A pioneering methodology, using both quantitative and qualitative research, provides a reliable and valid approach that challenges the heteronormative model in domestic violence research, policy and practice. The authors develops a new framework of analysis – practices of love – to explore empirical data.

Outlining the implications of the research for practice and service development, the book will be of interest to policy makers and practitioners in the field of domestic violence, especially those who provide services for sexual minorities, as well as students and academics interested in issues of domestic and interpersonal violence.

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Making a difference
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This important textbook makes a timely contribution to international agendas in social work with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) people. It examines how practitioners and student social workers can provide appropriate care across the lifespan (including work with children and families and older people) and considers key challenges in social work practice, for example asylum, mental health, and substance misuse. Drawing on practice scenarios, the book takes an enquiry-based learning approach to facilitate critical reflection. Its distinctive approach includes:

• use of the concepts of the Professional Capabilities Framework for social work

• key theoretical perspectives including human rights

• structuring of the text around the framework of the UK National Occupational Standards for Social Work

• student-friendly features including key questions and exercises

• a complete glossary of key terms and concepts

• examination of the UK policy and legislative context

It is informed by international research in social work with LGBT people

The book is essential reading for students on qualifying social work programmes and practitioners in statutory, voluntary and independent sectors.

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Multidisciplinary International Perspectives

Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. With an increasingly diverse ageing population, we need to expand our understanding of how social divisions intersect to affect outcomes in later life.

This edited collection examines ageing, gender, and sexualities from multidisciplinary and geographically diverse perspectives and looks at how these factors combine with other social divisions to affect experiences of ageing. It draws on theory and empirical data to provide both conceptual knowledge and clear ‘real-world’ illustrations.

The book includes section introductions to guide the reader through the debates and ideas and a glossary offering clear definitions of key terms and concepts.

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