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PART III Gender

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Transgender practices of identity, intimacy and care
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This book is a major contribution to contemporary gender and sexuality studies. At a time when transgender practices are the subject of increasing social and cultural visibility, it marks the first UK study of transgender identity formation. It is also the first examination - anywhere in the world - of transgender practices of intimacy and care.

The author addresses changing government legislation concerning the citizenship rights of transgender people. She examines the impact of legislative shifts upon transgender people’s identities, intimate relationships and practices of care and considers the implications for future social policy. The book encompasses key approaches from the fields of psychoanalysis, anthropology, lesbian and gay studies, sociology and gender theory.

Drawing on extensive interviews with transgender people, “TransForming gender" offers engaging, moving, and, at times, humorous accounts of the experiences of gender transition. Written in an accessible style, it provides a vivid insight into the diversity of living gender in today’s world.

The book will be essential reading for students and professionals in cultural studies, gender studies and sexuality studies as well as those in sociology, social policy, law, politics and philosophy. It will also be of interest to health and educational students, trainers and practitioners.

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Identity and Mental Wellbeing through the Lifecourse

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Gendering Women is an engaging and accessible account of how constructions of femininity fundamentally affect women’s mental wellbeing through the life course.

Led by women’s life history accounts of growing up and growing older in the north of England, this book shows how experiences of becoming and being a woman – in family life, education, employment, motherhood and situations of violence – both enable and erode self confidence and esteem. The challenges to women’s mental wellbeing cut across age and class differences and have profound impacts on the material conditions of women’s lives throughout the life course. This is in turn a driver of inequality that is often under-recognised in mainstream policy.

Based on feminist and ethnographically informed research with over five hundred women Gendering women provides a critical link between gender theory and the lived realities of women’s daily lives and will appeal to students and academics in sociology and social sciences.

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5 Gender One of the major critiques of sociology is that there is too great a focus on the ‘founding fathers’ of sociology, namely Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx and Max Weber. Although there are some prominent early female writers, like Harriet Martineau from Britain and Jane Adams from the US, early writings are predominately written by men, about men and for men. They wrote about the male experience and did not really take into account differences based on gender. If you go back and look at the earlier quotes by these theorists, they all use ‘he’, ‘him’, or

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Introduction In this chapter, we will look in more detail at the Universal Model and Partnership Model of providing childcare. We will seek to answer three main questions: 1. What is it about these models of childcare that leads to better gender equality? a) How do the different elements work? b) What are the ideas, institutions and actors that make it work? c) What could make these models of childcare not work to improve gender equality? 2. What aspects of these models of childcare could be transferred to other national contexts? a) What

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Gender is widely recognized as an important and useful lens for the study of International Relations. However, there are few books that specifically investigate masculinity/ies in relation to world politics.

Taking a feminist-inspired understanding of gender as its starting point, the book:

  • explains that gender is both an asymmetrical binary and a hierarchy;

  • shows how masculinization works via ‘nested hierarchies’ of domination and subordination;

  • explores the imbrication of masculinities with the nation-state and great-power politics;

  • develops an understanding of the arms trade with commercial processes of militarization.

Written in an accessible style, with suggestions for further reading, this book is an invaluable resource for students and teachers applying ‘the gender lens’ to global politics.

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1 ONE Introduction: gender and youth migration Glenda Tibe Bonifacio The global population is generally young. Those under 30  years old accounted for 50.5% of the world’s 7 billion population in 2012 (Euromonitor International, 2012). About 90% of these young people live in economically developing countries with a “youth bulge,” or the peak of youth share in the population (Sen and Kakar, 2017) in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Their numbers continue to increase and by 2014, according to the United Nations (UN) Population Fund, those between the ages

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Having discussed the various reasons to be critical of both big data and of the available quantitative data on gender and security, I proceed to an overview of the gender gap in technology access. This section begins by presenting some of the available knowledge on gender gaps in technology development, proceeds to discuss gender gaps in technology use and how these can be contextualized within research on FSS, and applies these insights to a case study of regional issues in gender and technology in selected South Asian countries. The analysis broadly makes

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How pensions need to adapt to changing family forms
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An emerging consensus sees British pension policy as unravelling. Yet the gender impact of expanding private pension provision and relying increasingly on means-testing has been largely overlooked.

This book examines key issues such as: how pension choices over the lifecourse are structured by gender, class and ethnicity; the impact of changing patterns of partnership and parenthood on pension building; the distributional impact of privatising pensions; questions about individualisation of rights, survivor benefits, a citizen’s pension and means-testing; the EU dimension - comparing alternative strategies for improving gender equity.

The book is essential reading for teachers, researchers and students in social gerontology, sociology, social policy and women’s studies; practitioners in social work and welfare rights; policy makers concerned with income in later life; and all those who wish to improve their understanding of pensions issues.

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Kimberley and I were chatting together one lunch time, sitting on opposite sides of the lunch table. She was buoyantly explicating her views on the relationships between gender identity and violence, and I was listening intently, intrigued to hear her latest opinions on the subject. I had the opportunity to work closely with Kim during my time volunteering – assisting her in her work and talking with her regularly in our breaks. She’s a young, educated, self-proclaimed ‘urban Māori’ who loves debating with her colleagues, myself included, about gender

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