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211 Afterword: rethinking gender equality Lena Martinsson, Gabriele Griffin, Katarina Giritli Nygren Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity. /…/. When we reject the single story, when we realize that there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise. (Adichie, 2009) In her lecture ‘The danger of a single story’, author Chimamanda

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Introduction In this chapter, we will look in more detail at the Universal Model and Partnership Model of providing childcare. We will seek to answer three main questions: 1. What is it about these models of childcare that leads to better gender equality? a) How do the different elements work? b) What are the ideas, institutions and actors that make it work? c) What could make these models of childcare not work to improve gender equality? 2. What aspects of these models of childcare could be transferred to other national contexts? a) What

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International Best Practice in Childcare and Long-term Care Policy

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. Drawing on comparative research from five countries, What Works in Improving Gender Equality provides an accessible analysis of what gender equality means and how we can achieve it by adapting best practices in care policies from other countries.

Realistic policy solutions are reached by examining the contexts in which childcare and longterm care policies are developed, and what difficulties might need to be overcome in applying the lessons from different international models.

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The limits of political ambition?

Gender equality is often seen as a hallmark of the Nordic countries. This book explores this notion by examining the meanings of gender that underpin policies in the Scandinavian welfare states, historically and today.

The book focuses on three Scandinavian countries - Denmark, Norway and Sweden - and explores the policy reforms that have occurred relating to family and care. Beginning with the radical marriage reform carried through in all the three countries in the early decades of the 20th century, the book progresses to explore contemporary challenges to the traditional model of equality, including equal rights for fathers, multiculturalism and a critical young generation. The book focuses on differences as well as similarities between the countries and discusses the relevance of talking about a Nordic model.

Stressing the importance of viewing the concept of equality in its historical context, the book critically investigates and discusses the Scandinavian ‘success story’ portrayed in normative political theory and presents an historical analysis of the development of gendered citizenship rights.

It will be a valuable collection for researchers, lecturers and graduate students who work with historical and contemporary studies on welfare state and gender models from different disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives.

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49 TWO Normalisation meets governmentality: gender equality reassembled Katarina Giritli Nygren, Siv Fahlgren, Anders Johansson Introduction This chapter explores the ways in which discourses of gender equality have become intertwined with neoliberal discourses and policies in Sweden today and thus (re)assembled and (re)interpreted in different ways, and what this does to feminist theory. The Nordic countries in general have an enviable reputation for gender equality politics and practices, and an important aspect of the national self-image of Swedes is

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149 European Journal of Politics and Gender • vol 1 • no 1–2 • 149–66 © European Conference on Politics and Gender and Bristol University Press 2018 Print ISSN 2515 1088 • Online ISSN 2515 1096 https://doi.org/10.1332/251510818X15272520831085 RESEARCH Power struggles: gender equality in political representation Karen Celis, Karen.Celis@vub.ac.be Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium Joni Lovenduski, j.lovenduski@bbk.ac.uk University of London, UK Gender inequality in political representation remains despite widespread and long-standing feminist campaigns

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Part Two Current challenges: competing discourses on gender equality

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A Nordic model of gender equality? Introduction Kari Melby, Anna-Birte Ravn and Christina Carlsson Wetterberg The challenges of today The overall objective of this book is to analyse the meanings of gender that underpin policies for the achievement of gender equality in the Scandinavian welfare states, ie Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The book focuses on similarities as well as differences between the countries and discusses the relevance of talking about a Nordic model. Different meanings of gender equality and the relationship between discourse and

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Introduction In this chapter, we will look in more detail at the Universal and Partnership Models of providing long-term care. We will seek to answer three main questions: 1. What is it about these models of long-term care policy that leads to better gender equality? a. How do the different elements work? b. What are the ideas, institutions, and actors that make it work? c. What could make these models not work to improve gender equality? 2. What aspects of these models could be transferred to other national contexts? a. What do we know

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Authors: Gillian Pascall and Anna Kwak

161 Gender equality in the wider Europe SEVEN Gender equality in the wider Europe Introduction The recent accessions to the European Union brings new questions about the aspirations of mothers in the new CEE member states. Will there be support in Europe for their social agenda, for more collective responsibility for children? Will women’s employment be supported in quality as well as quantity? Will there be support for gender equality in households and policies to allow work–life balance for both men and women? What are the implications of European Union

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