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by these consultants given the uncertainties associated with large-scale investments and the volatility of the global economy. In doing so I am making the claim that planning technocracies can be understood through their ‘instruments’ (Lascoumes and Le Galè s, 2007 ) and ‘governmental technologies’, that is, the ‘complex of mundane programmes, calculations, techniques, apparatuses, documents and procedures through which authorities seek to embody and give effect to governmental ambitions’ (Miller and Rose, 1990 : 175). By enquiring the inner working logics of

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for the caregiver journey, (2) a consistent rate of progress on that journey for either the carer or care recipient and (3) a sense of either urgent necessity or singular deficit among carers, the concept of ‘need’ appears less than fit for the purpose of developing sustainable carer technology. Simply put, need as a construct is insufficiently sensitive to the carer’s context and needs to be challenged if we are to move forward. Shifting from ‘needs’ to ‘goals’ How, then, might UCD focused on sustainability for governments, technology developers and carers

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subjectivity of citizens (Gibson, 2001; Davoudi and Madanipour, 2015). The same bond between people and place is mobilised by community organisations and citizen groups to inspire participants and foster their ability to bring about change (Somerville, 2016). A political analysis of ‘emplacement’, therefore, can help us interpret government technologies of localism and decode the way in which they are acted out by communities. This chapter explores the passion for place that can be expressed in localism and its planning initiatives. Planning scholarship tends to shy

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negotiate alternative identities to those prescribed to them through policy discourse and in this sense their subjectivities serve as sites of resistance. Technologies of the self The official discourses of women’s drug use not only govern their actual substance use through the governmental technologies of prohibition, medicalisation and welfarisation, but also shape and sustain their using identities. This is made possible through various technologies of the self that operate in the lives of the female users. Foucault argues that technologies of the self exist in

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Women’s experiences of drug policy
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Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. This book is the first to examine how female drug user’s identities, and hence their experiences, are shaped by drug policies. It analyses how the subjectivities ascribed to women users within drug policy sustain them in their problematic use and reinforce their social exclusion. Challenging popular misconceptions of female users, the book calls for the formulation of drug policies to be based on gender equity and social justice. It will appeal to academics in the social sciences, practitioners and policy makers.

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This book is about the ways in which the governance of illicit drug use shapes female dependent drug users’ lives. It argues female drug users’ subjectivities, and hence their experiences, are shaped and regulated by drug policies. The relationship between the social regulation of female drug users and the “making up” of their identities is investigated. It explores the dominant governmental technologies of power from which the key constructions of women as “problematic” drug users emanate in the UK, Canada and the US: punishment and prohibition, medicalisation and welfarisation. It also investigates the meanings that women who identify as having dependent drug use attach to their drug use and themselves. Insights are gathered from the in-depth accounts of 40 female drug users in the UK. The book argues, in the regulation of illicit drug using women, particular subjectivities are constructed which, in themselves, become part of the narrative sustaining women in their problematic drug use. It asserts that female users experience drug policy as something that exacerbates their social and economic marginalisation and contributes to their lives being plunged into further marginalisation. At the same time, it analyses the contradictory choices, adaptations and resistances of female users. Although women users internalise many of the negative constructions of them found in policy discourse they also find ways to resist them. Popular misconceptions of female users which condition oppressive interventions are subverted with the hope of contributing to the formulation of drug policies based on empowerment, gender equity and social justice.

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This book is about the ways in which the governance of illicit drug use shapes female dependent drug users’ lives. It argues female drug users’ subjectivities, and hence their experiences, are shaped and regulated by drug policies. The relationship between the social regulation of female drug users and the “making up” of their identities is investigated. It explores the dominant governmental technologies of power from which the key constructions of women as “problematic” drug users emanate in the UK, Canada and the US: punishment and prohibition, medicalisation and welfarisation. It also investigates the meanings that women who identify as having dependent drug use attach to their drug use and themselves. Insights are gathered from the in-depth accounts of 40 female drug users in the UK. The book argues, in the regulation of illicit drug using women, particular subjectivities are constructed which, in themselves, become part of the narrative sustaining women in their problematic drug use. It asserts that female users experience drug policy as something that exacerbates their social and economic marginalisation and contributes to their lives being plunged into further marginalisation. At the same time, it analyses the contradictory choices, adaptations and resistances of female users. Although women users internalise many of the negative constructions of them found in policy discourse they also find ways to resist them. Popular misconceptions of female users which condition oppressive interventions are subverted with the hope of contributing to the formulation of drug policies based on empowerment, gender equity and social justice.

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) historically expert knowledge has designed interventions and treatments predominantly aimed at male users, and (b) many interventions and treatments specific to female users situate them as pathological or unfit mothers. Technologies of power The control and surveillance of female (and male) illicit drug users is administered through various governmental technologies of power. This book investigates the dominant governmental technologies of power from which the key constructions of women as problematic drug users emanate. Technologies of power are the ways of acting

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policy. Second, it involved an analysis of the dominant governmental technologies of power from which the key constructions of women as ‘problematic’ drug users emanate in the UK, US and Canada – punishment and prohibition, medicalisation and welfarisation. The construction of female users’ subjectivities in policy discourse and the impact the characteristics ascribed to them have on their experiences have also been examined. Third, it investigated the meanings that women who identify as having dependent drug use attach to their drug use and to themselves

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settings. This issue’s Debates and Issues section includes three contributions, from Canada, Australia and Japan. ‘Towards sustainable family care: using goals to reframe the user-centred design of technologies to support carers’, by Myles Leslie, Jacquie Eales, Janet Fast, Ben Mortenson, Oladele Atoyebi and Akram Khayatzadeh-Mahani (all involved in Canada’s AGEWELL Network of Centres of Excellence), considers the design process for carer support technology. This is used as a lens to examine the different definitions involved when governments, technology developers and

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