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113 FOUR Maintaining health and well- being: overcoming barriers to healthy ageing Sara Arber, Ann Bowling, Andrea Creech, Myanna Duncan, Anna Goulding, Diane Gyi, Susan Hallam, Cheryl Haslam, Aadil Kazi, Liz Lloyd, Janet Lord, MAP2030 team, Mike Murphy, Andrew Newman, Anna C. Phillips, Ricardo Twumasi and Jane Upton This chapter concentrates on health and well-being, drawing on 11 New Dynamics of Ageing (NDA) projects covering the whole range, from basic biology to the arts and humanities. Our main purpose is to employ the findings from our projects to

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59 FOUR Healthy ageing across the life course Diana Kuh, Rebecca Hardy, Catharine Gale, Jane Elliott, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Rachel Cooper and the HALCyon team Introduction The New Dynamics of Ageing (NDA) project Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) responded to a growing consensus from scientists, research funders and policymakers that ageing needs to be studied from an interdisciplinary and life course perspective to inform strategies for maintaining a population that remains healthy and independent for longer. Healthy ageing is a term that is

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69 FIVE Healthy ageing: upstream actions to prevent illness introduction In this chapter the aim is to explore in greater depth the idea of primary prevention in health, often referred to as ‘upstream’ action. In the context of health, the idea of prevention is complicated by the different ways of conceptualising health. The key focus of upstream interventions to promote health in later life is on the gap between life expectancy and healthy life expectancy. The idea of the compression of morbidity has generated a plethora of studies designed to identify

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focus of this chapter. We present a case study of ‘Neighbourhood Networks’ in Leeds to explore how their work in support of ‘healthy ageing’ has been affected by the pandemic. Each ‘Leeds Neighbourhood Network’ (LNN) is an independent VSO that aims to support older people (referred to as their ‘members’) to live independently and to participate in their communities through a range of activities and services that are provided at a neighbourhood level. The LNNs grew from a single initiative established in 1986 as ‘Belle Isle Elderly Winter Aid’ that was set up to

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Drawing on case studies of two ageing rural communities in north-east Victoria, Australia, this article explores how older volunteers both contribute to, and are supported by, third sector activities and services within rural environments. As such, volunteer activities build healthy ageing in rural settings, and contribute to community viability. However, further analyses suggest that reliance on third sector voluntarism also presents serious challenges for the future. This is particularly the case in relation to the sustainability of healthy ageing in rural settings where public sector resources are being rationalised. Our findings show that there are risks associated with an over-reliance on volunteers in rural communities and with the excessive regulation of volunteers unless appropriate infrastructure and support are provided.

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of the term ‘the fourth age’, their formulations presume an inherent duality to old age – a ‘good’ versus a ‘bad’ old age, with ‘successful’ versus ‘unsuccessful’ outcomes. This latter distinction – ‘successful’ versus ‘unsuccessful’ ageing – has gained considerable traction since it was first outlined by Rowe and Kahn in their paper on ‘usual’ versus ‘successful’ ageing. They intended to challenge what they called ‘a gerontology of the usual’ by stressing the distinction between normal ageing as disease-free healthy ageing and ‘ageing as usual’, with its

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the complex interplay between family dynamics, cultural norms and social influences that have an impact on the ability of older Bangladeshi adults to eat more healthily and to engage in physical and social activities that promote healthy ageing. References Alexander, C., Firoz, S. and Rashid, N. (2010) The Bengali diaspora in Britain: A review of the literature, London: London School of Economics. Available at www.banglastories.org/uploads/Literature_review.pdf BBC News Southeast Wales (2011) ‘In pictures: Vanja Garaj’s lives of Bangladeshi women’, 20

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source of care for older people ( WHO, 2015 ). The United Nations (UN) Decade of Healthy Ageing (2021–30) ( WHO, 2020 ) provides a focal point for understanding the embeddedness of beliefs about family responsibility for care and its impact on older people and their carers. The UN plan ( WHO, 2020 ) that will guide work during this decade builds on the Madrid Plan of Action on Ageing ( UN, 2002 ) and is aligned with the UN Agenda 3030 on Sustainable Development ( UN, 2015a ). The plan was developed following extensive consultation and draws directly on the World

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A Theory of Model Ageing
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This controversial book argues that concepts such as ‘successful’ and ‘active’ ageing - ubiquitous terms in research, marketing and policy making concerned with older adults – are potentially dangerous paradigms that reflect and exacerbate inequalities in older populations.

This author presents a new theory to make sense of the popularity of these ‘successful’ and ‘active’ ageing concepts. Readers are invited to view them through the prism of Model Ageing – a theory that throws light on the causes and consequences of attempts to model ageing as a phenomenon and stage of life that is in need of direction, reshaping and control.

This is essential reading for anyone seeking to make sense of social constructions of ageing in contemporary societies.

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(Engin et al, 2010). Current challenges for healthy ageing therefore include how to reduce risk factors for these diseases and how to promote healthier lifestyles. Primary healthcare, rehabilitation and health promotion must become essential dimensions of changing the focus of health services to meet the needs of their ageing populations in all the Mediterranean countries. It is particularly important for the Southern Mediterranean countries, where some countries’ national reports and action plans, for example, Turkey, provide a firm basis for implementing such

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