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dangers and the necessity to continue the struggle for women’s and girls’ human rights. Two insights propel this on-going activism. First, the assertion that human rights are interdependent and indivisible, that is, that ‘no person’s rights are secure unless all people’s rights are secure’ and that ‘no right is secure unless all rights are secure’ (Ackerly, 2016 : 38). Second, it is the recognition that the figure of the ‘human’, which underpins the concept of human rights, is in fact gendered. Put differently, although human rights propagate the notion of a

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127 Equality and human rights: siblings or just rivals? Trevor Phillips This article is based on a speech given at the social Justice and Public Policy conference on 6 December 2006 in London. The author was until recently Chair of the Commission of Racial Equality and has now been appointed as Chair of the new Commission for Equality and Human Rights in Britain. The article sets out his views on the relationship between equality and human rights. It argues that choices need to be made in politics and public policy in managing tensions between diverse

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PART I International human rights: context

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1 Human rights and equality in education: Introduction Sandra Fredman, Meghan Campbell and Helen Taylor Education is at the heart of the global struggle to alleviate poverty and reduce inequality. It has been demonstrated that one extra year of education is associated with a reduction in inequality (as measured by the Gini coefficient) of 1.4 percentage points.1 Yet it is precisely the most disadvantaged who face the greatest obstacles to accessing quality education. Although some progress has been made in recent decades, there were still as many as 57

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The time has come to further challenge biomedical and clinical thinking about dementia, which has for so long underpinned policy and practice. Framing dementia as a disability, this book takes a rights-based approach to expand the debate.

Applying a social constructionist lens, it builds on earlier critical perspectives by bringing together concepts including disability, social inclusion, personhood, equality, participation, dignity, empowerment, autonomy and solidarity. Launching the debate into new and exciting territory, the book argues that people living with dementia come within the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and therefore have full entitlement to all the rights the Convention enshrines.

A human rights-based approach has not to date been fully applied to interrogate the lived experience and policy response to dementia. With the fresh analytical tools provided in this book, policy makers and practitioners will will gain new insights into how this broader perspective can be used to further promote the quality of life and quality of care for all those affected by dementia.

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2.1 Introduction This chapter outlines the human rights framework for addressing disability harassment. The purpose of the chapter is to explain the legal context in which disability harassment occurs and to highlight the obligations of states to address it, particularly in the EU. The chapter begins with a brief overview of the general human rights framework relevant to both disability harassment at work and intersectional forms of discrimination. These include the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), the Convention on

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Comparative perspectives on the right to education for minorities and disadvantaged groups

Thousands of children from minority and disadvantaged groups will never cross the threshold of a classroom. What can human rights contribute to the struggle to ensure that every learner is able to access high quality education?

This brilliant interdisciplinary collection explores how a human rights perspective offers new insights and tools into the current obstacles to education. It examines the role of private actors, the need to hold states to account for the quality of education, how to strike a balance between religion, culture and education, the innovative responses needed to guarantee girls’ right to education and the role of courts.

This unique book draws together contributors who have been deeply involved in this field from both developing and developed countries which enriches the understanding and remedial approaches to tackle current obstacles to universal education.

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169 TEN Human rights and equality in education: Conclusion Sandra Fredman, Meghan Campbell and Helen Taylor This collection of essays has explored a range of challenges faced by minorities and disadvantaged groups in education. The book demonstrates how a human rights-based approach brings these challenges into sharper focus and offers a framework for addressing them so that we can achieve quality education for all. These insights are enriched through the comparative perspective provided by the range of jurisdictions featured in the collection. Such a

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This chapter explores the meaning of human rights for older people, and for the social workers who work with them, within what is often referred to as a human rights and social justice profession ( International Federation of Social Workers, 2014 ). At the outset, it must be understood that although human rights invoke ‘moral obligation’ ( Townsend, 2006 , p 166) and ‘can provide social workers with a moral basis for their practice’ ( Ife, 2012 , p 1) they are not fixed. Human rights are both dynamic and complex. They pose complicated and difficult questions

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We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with inherent and unalienable Rights; that among these, are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. (United States Declaration of Independence, adopted by Congress, 4 July 1776) The history of human rights in the United States has been a paradox. Despite the theoretical adherence to equal human rights in the foundation documents of the country itself, in practice they were not extended to many sections of the population – in particular African

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