Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14,501 items for :

  • "inclusion" x
Clear All

pedagogy to developing more inclusive models of scholarship and resisting the neoliberal forces that dominate scholarly publication. Though they do not cover everything, they exemplify the ferment that seeks to bring equality and justice to higher education, and they support readers to develop their own understanding and use of, to use a phrase developed in this volume (Schmidt, Chapter 11 ), critical methods of teaching and research. Diversity, inclusion, and decolonization In this work, this volume engages the concepts ‘diversity’, ‘inclusion’, and

Full Access

131 EIGHT community, inclusion and belonging This chapter addresses the questions: • What are the implications of the ideas about a good life for the lives of people with intellectual disabilities? • What values relevant to defining a good life underpin current disability theories, ideas and discourses? • What contribution have these values made to the lives of people with intellectual disabilities? One of the strands of a good life identified in Chapter Two is that it is a life that balances virtue with pleasure, and duty with commitment; where human needs

Restricted access

challenging systems of injustice. The role of the community worker, therefore, goes beyond the work to support and amplify the voices of the group with whom they are working. It is also to influence and inform other groups, organisations and service providers to understand how to promote inclusion in the work that they do. If we see the work we do in isolation and not in the round, then our work will invariably bring harms against others, unless we are able to think critically and reflexively ( McArdle et al, 2020 ). Many of the people with whom we work in communities

Restricted access

This chapter defines and discusses key concepts and terminology relating to health and biomedical research, equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI), disability, neurodiversity, race and ethnicity, sex and gender, and sexual orientation. These terms evolve, are debated, and can be the subject of much contestation. The chapter will acknowledge additional categories of diversity that might be impacting on researchers’ careers, and the concept of intersectionality will be introduced. Concepts that are introduced will be referred to and revisited in subsequent

Open access

35 THREE inclusion of pupils from refugee families Geri Smyth, George MacBride, Grace Paton and Nathalie Sheridan ‘Samah is a good friend. We’ve been friends since primary 2. She came in February and I came at the end of primary 1. We meet in the summer [holidays]. We ask her mum or my mum if we can go out to play. I live in the flats ... The lift sometimes gets stuck. I get a wee bit scared. My mum likes to come to the swings … just in case of trouble. ‘When I used to cry, and some [children] used to annoy me, she [Samah] used to come and say “What’s the

Restricted access

Part One Issues in social inclusion

Open access

93 CHAPTER 6 Inclusion in schools Introduction Chapter 2 established a conceptual framework for understanding wellbeing and its relationships to other concepts on a Deleuzian ‘plane of consistency’. In Chapter 5, we explored the relationships between flourishing, happiness and wellbeing, and how these concepts are used interdependently to cross-refer to each to provide an understanding of wellbeing and, as far as measurement of the concept is concerned, its operationalisation as a concept. In a similar way that flourishing, happiness and wellbeing are

Restricted access

have more pressured and precarious lives. Alienating these major sections of society from the universal change required places in peril the whole decarbonization project ( Chapter 12 ). As such, the importance of incorporating inclusion within the post-carbon imperative cannot be overestimated, as this whole collection has sought to illustrate. A normative focus on economic growth and technology over wellbeing and socially determined limits marginalizes ‘alternatives’ to the status quo to fringe experiments. In fact, such alternatives attempt to challenge precisely

Restricted access
Critique and Alternatives
Author:

Should the public play a greater role within the financial system?

Decisions about money are a part of our everyday lives. Supporters promote financial inclusion as a way of helping people navigate decisions about money. However, critics fear these policies promote the financialisation of the welfare state and turn citizens into consumers.

Presenting a nuanced, critical analysis of financial inclusion, Rajiv Prabhakar brings together the supportive and critical literatures which have, until now, developed in parallel. Addressing key issues including the poverty premium, financial capability and housing, this essential dialogue advances crucial public, academic and policy debates and proposes alternative paths forward.

Restricted access

Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. This book is about the experiences of students in institutions of higher education from ‘non-traditional’ backgrounds. The expansion of Higher Education world-wide shows no signs of slowing down and there is already a large literature on who has access to higher education and to qualifications that offer higher life-time incomes and status. However to date there has been minimal focus on what happens to the students once they are in the institutions and the inequalities that they face. This book aims to fill this gap in the literature.

The chapters demonstrate that the students and their families are finding ways of acquiring forms of capital that encourage and sustain their participation in higher education. Contributions from the UK, the USA and Australia reveal that the issues surrounding the inclusion of ‘non-traditional’ students are broadly similar in different countries. It should be read by all those leading, managing, or teaching in, institutions of higher education and all students or intending students whatever their background.

Open access