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European Perspectives in Family and Society

Population ageing today affects most industrialised countries, and it will have an impact on many facets of the social system. Intergenerational relationships will play a key role in dealing with the demographical and societal change. This book provides innovative views in the multidisciplinary research field of intergenerational family relations in society, with a focus on Europe. Different, but complementary, perspectives are integrated in one volume bringing together international scholars from sociology, psychology and economics. The book's chapters are grouped into three thematic sections which cover conceptual issues, multigenerational and cross-cultural perspectives, as well as applied issues. Implications for research, policy and practice are addressed and suggestions for future directions are discussed. By raising recent discussions on controversial issues, this book will stimulate the current discourse at various levels. Intergenerational relations in society and family will be equally interesting for researchers, advanced-level students and stakeholders in the fields of social policy, population ageing and intergenerational family relationships.

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Author: Elaine Statham

471© The Policy Press • 2009 • ISSN 1744 2648 Evidence & Policy • vol 5 • no 4 • 2009 • 471-88 • 10.1332/174426409X478798 pr ac tic e Key words intergenerational • cohesion • social capiptal • research Promoting intergenerational programmes: where is the evidence to inform policy and practice? Elaine Statham UK government and non-governmental organisations are promoting the use of intergenerational programmes in England and Wales to improve community cohesion. However, much thought needs to be given to designing programmes, and intergenerational projects

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217 Critical and Radical Social Work • vol 4 • no 2 • 217–30 • © Policy Press 2016 • #CRSW Print ISSN 2049 8608 • Online ISSN 2049 8675 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204986016X14601003012367 Accepted for publication 10 March 2016 • First published online 15 April 2016 article Intergenerational trauma framework for programme efficacy studies: child trauma recovery in occupied Palestine Ian Barron, i.g.z.barron@dundee.ac.uk University of Dundee, UK James McInnes, Criminologist, Melbourne, Australia Ghassan Abdallah, Director, Centre for Applied Research

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Lived Experiences in China, Uganda and the UK

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development makes climate change and responsible consumption key priorities for both industrialized and emerging economies. Moving beyond the Global North, this book uses innovative cross-national and cross-generational research with urban residents in China and Uganda, as well as the UK, to illuminate international debates about building sustainable societies and to examine how different cultures think about past, present and future responsibility for climate change.

The authors explore to what extent different nations see climate change as a domestic issue, whilst looking at local explanatory and blame narratives to consider profound questions of justice between those nations that are more and less responsible for, and vulnerable to, climate change.

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Key messages ANZ-ICC brings together three major intergenerational cohorts in Australia and New Zealand. ANZ-ICC will map preconception predictors of next generation outcomes in early childhood. ANZ-ICC findings will inform new ways of breaking intergenerational cycles of risk. Background The first 1,000 days of life play a seminal role in shaping patterns of health and well-being across the life course and remain central priority targets in national and international policy on child development ( Patton et al, 2018 ). However, a growing body of

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303 Families, Relationships and Societies • vol 3 • no 2 • 303-18 • © Policy Press 2014 • #FRS ISSN 2046 7435 • ISSN 2046 7466 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204674313X669720 article The temporality of food practices: intergenerational relations, childhood memories and mothers’ food practices in working families with young children Abigail Knight, a.knight@ioe.ac.uk Rebecca O’Connell, r.oconnell@ioe.ac.uk Julia Brannen, j.brannen@ioe.ac.uk Institute of Education, University of London, UK Drawing on the findings of a qualitative study of 48 families with

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Family reciprocity from a global perspective
Editor: Misa Izuhara

With socio-economic and demographic changes taking place in contemporary societies, new patterns of family relations are forming partly due to significant family changes, value shifts, precariousness in the labour market, and increasing mobility within and beyond national boundaries.

This book explores the exchange of support between generations and examines variations in contemporary practices and rationales in different regions and societies. It draws on both theoretical perspectives and empirical analysis in relation to new patterns of family reciprocity. Contributors discuss both newly emerging patterns and more established ones which are now being affected due to various opportunities and pressures in contemporary societies.

The book is split into two parts, the first (Chapters one to four) reviews key theoretical and conceptual debates in this field, while the second (Chapter five to nine) offers insights and an understanding of exchange practices based on case studies from different regions and different relationships.

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Author: Jonathan Wistow

Introduction In this chapter we will explore intergenerational aspects of the social contract by considering the situation now and looking ahead to future prospects. Fraser’s (2016) account of a crisis of social reproduction (which includes social capacities such as giving birth to and raising children, care for family and friends, maintaining households and communities and sustaining social connections) in financialised capitalism provides a useful context for this discussion. Fraser (2016 : 113) argues that finance capital disciplines ‘states and

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139 Families, Relationships and Societies • vol 3 • no 1 • 139–42 • © Policy Press 2014 • #FRS Print ISSN 2046 7435 • Online ISSN 2046 7443 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204674313X13808738507523 Consumption of care and intergenerational relations in the Irish context Catherine Conlon,1 conlonce@tcd.ie, and Virpi Timonen, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland Thomas Scharf and Gemma Carney National University of Ireland, Galway key words care • intergenerational • ageing • Ireland Intergenerational family relations have been explained using conceptual frameworks of

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13 Part I Conceptual issues regarding intergenerational relations

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