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the same importance. Yet by now, it is well established that many of the activities we engage in during our lifetime will have profound effects on the welfare and composition of generations to come. Contemporary ways of living and acting trigger a need to consider the relevance of an intergenerational justice framework – covering justice and injustices between generations. Reflecting on these issues, thinkers such as Stephen Gardiner (2001 , pp 401–402), Brian Barry (2003) and Axel Gosseries (2009) point to modern lifestyles (and not necessarily population

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Lived Experiences in China, Uganda and the UK

The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development makes climate change and responsible consumption key priorities for both industrialized and emerging economies. Moving beyond the Global North, this book uses innovative cross-national and cross-generational research with urban residents in China and Uganda, as well as the UK, to illuminate international debates about building sustainable societies and to examine how different cultures think about past, present and future responsibility for climate change.

The authors explore to what extent different nations see climate change as a domestic issue, whilst looking at local explanatory and blame narratives to consider profound questions of justice between those nations that are more and less responsible for, and vulnerable to, climate change.

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CONCLUSION The precariat, intergenerational justice and universal basic income Juliana Bidadanure* School of Politics, Economics and Philosophy, University of York, York, UK This inspiring special issue provides an overview of the multidimensional nature of precariousness in the neoliberal world. It takes issue with the numerous forms of insecurity that a multitude of people experience in their daily lives. The authors alternately employ the concepts of precariat, precariatization and precariousness as tools to address the ways in which people stand in relation

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discuss the question of how far political rights, especially the right of children to vote, can contribute to counteracting adultism and thus contribute to overcoming the colonized status of children and childhoods. This question will be discussed not only in relation to children living today, but also in relation to future generations and intergenerational justice. First, we will outline what is meant by adultism and its conflict-laden relationship with children’s rights. Adultism and children’s rights What is called adultism refers to the belittling of

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, which was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Care for the Future programme from 2014 to 2017. INTERSECTION was an innovative, cross-national programme that employed participatory arts and social science methods to explore the themes of intergenerational justice, consumption and sustainability with urban residents in three cities: Jinja in Uganda, Nanjing in China, and Sheffield in the United Kingdom. These cities are very differently positioned in relation to global networks of production and consumption, processes of (de)industrialization, and

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recognition. It is declined or withdrawn where respect for human dignity is denied, where the 71 Intergenerational policy and relationships right to life and bodily integrity is violated, where freedom of access is obstructed and where equality and social participation are denied by force. That is why, in their individual and social aspects, human rights are important indicators of such injustices’ (all quotes: Huber, 1996, p 184). In this way, the possibility is opened up for an enhanced understanding of intergenerational justice. It can now be linked to reflections

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everyone had the ecological footprint of the average United States citizen, we would need four planets to sustain us instead of one (McDonald, 2015 ). This highlights how some people take up far more than their fair share of ‘environmental space’, enjoying high consumption lifestyles while extracting labour and resources from, and displacing pollution to, poorer parts of the world (Pearce, 2008 ; Agyeman, 2013 ). This raises profound questions of intra- and intergenerational justice in relation to current consumption trends in long-established high income countries

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This chapter explores how local perceptions of climate change intersect with considerations of environmental justice, contrasting moral readings of climate change that differently emphasise ‘universal’, ‘industrial’ and ‘local’ blame. It contrasts Jinja residents’ narratives of self-blame for recent droughts, which linked (local) climate change with local causality, with Nanjing and Sheffield residents’ focus on the global scale of climate change and ‘meta-emitters’ in government and industry. This chapter argues that these moral geographies of climate change affect the extent to which people are willing to assume responsibility for environmental stewardship; much more so than their relative carbon footprint. In posing the question ‘Who is responsible for what?’, it explores divergent moral framings of climate change as a problem for them, there and thenor us, here and now and the possibilities of caring at a distance. This includes attention to the intergenerational challenges of climate change vis-à-vis urban residents’ perspectives on caring for the future and historical responsibility.

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Arctic’ ( NATO Parliamentary Assembly, 2017 ). The chapter examines elements of this polarizing debate within the context of intergenerational justice in Scandinavia. For vulnerable Indigenous populations, even though mechanisms for engagement, such as the free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) procedure exist, the implementation of geoengineering governance has to the potential to perpetuate existing colonial governance mechanisms. This effectively places Indigenous peoples in a less than adequate position. The focus lays primarily in considering questions such as

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ability of future generations to meet their own needs’ (WCED, 1987 : 43). This often-cited reference to intergenerational justice has shaped the popular understanding of SD, while inter-regional (social) justice has received a lot less attention. As just one case in point, there is no section entitled ‘social’ in a 2014 exhaustive, four-volume publication on Sustainable Development , and topics that could be interpreted as social are conspicuously under-represented (Blewitt, 2014 ). This relative neglect is in contrast to the intent of the Brundtland Commission

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