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193 Phoebe V. Moore The International Political Economy of Work and Employability By Phoebe V. Moore Author’s Reply by Phoebe V. Moore 1 The reviewed book, International Political Economy of Work and Employability (Palgrave, 2010) was published in the International Political Economy series and was launched at Blackwell’s on Oxford Road in Manchester 12 th November 2010. In the first instance, I would like to thank my reviewers, Ian Bruff, John Smith, and Owen Worth for their generous and fair comments. And secondly, I encourage the

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190 Owen Worth The International Political Economy of Work and Employability By Phoebe V. Moore Review by Owen Worth1 Phoebe Moore’s book ‘The International Political Economy of Work and Employability’ draws our attention to a much neglected area of study within the discipline of International Political Economy (IPE). The main contribution of the book is to show how education and skills have been restructured in order to become more employable to the wider global political economy. Much has been made of the notion and the idea of the

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Ian Bruff 183 The International Political Economy of Work and Employability By Phoebe V. Moore Review by Ian Bruff1 There is much to admire in Moore’s book. It is an ambitious discussion that covers a range of literatures (IPE, Gramscian studies, labour process theories, autonomism, comparative political economy) in order to remind us of the centrality of work to the ongoing reproduction of capitalism. This is underpinned by an emphasis on the production of subjectivity and selfhood through work, which seeks to outflank both what

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John Smith 187 The International Political Economy of Work and Employability By Phoebe V. Moore Review by John Smith The subject of this stimulating book is employability, shorthand for how ‘workers… manage their subjectivities and… equip themselves to remain employable in preparation for the post-industrial world’ (p. 2). Its central thesis is that ‘employability’ is being redefined by ‘an increasingly international hegemonic project of skills reform that occurs within the superstructure, or in this case at the level of ideas and

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REPLY ‘As if “relations” mattered’: a reply to Martin Weber Matt Davies* International Political Economy, School of Geography, Politics, and Sociology, Newcastle University, UK This is a reply to: Weber, Martin. 2014. “As if ‘relations’ mattered: how to subvert positional bias in social science with a lot of help from ‘others’….” Global Discourse. 4 (1): 1–13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23269995.2013.805513 Martin Weber’s article ‘As if “relations” mattered’ arrives as a provocation. It is a provocation that, characteristically for Weber, is pointed, humble

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rather comments on regional dynamics. Moreover, the focus here is on insights that have been produced from – or are sensitive to – an international political economy perspective. While more will be said about the characteristics of the international political economy perspective (that is, the framework) in the next section, here, it can be mentioned that, on one level, such a perspective is attentive to the involvement of international organizations in formal and informal processes related to policy change that involve local, national, and international actors. What

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Key messages There are a series of blind spots in the study of Global Political Economy. Most Global Political Economy research has not taken into account the political economy of East Asia. Introduction Attempts to broaden the fields of Global Political Economy (GPE) and Comparative Political Economy have proliferated over recent decades. This is reflected in the focus of the recent special issue of the Review of International Political Economy – ‘Blind Spots in IPE’ – which sought to highlight understudied and underappreciated areas. As LeBaron

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chapters jointly in order to present cross-cutting themes. The themes included here are organized according to the framework discussed in Chapter 2 – rooted in international political economy – which, it should be noted, also served as the analytic guide in the process of producing the individual studies. 3 To summarize the discussion of the framework from Chapter 2 , the three levels, or dimensions, of the framework highlight: (a) processes of policy making and how these are affected by such considerations as geopolitical constraints, capitalist pressures, and

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international influence, these publications are, to date, only available in Spanish (see, for example, Alemán et al, 2016 ; Cruz, 2022 ). A second way to grasp the extent to which international influence has been a focus of education research in the region is the scoping review conducted by Edwards (2018a) . This review examined the countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. It retained studies that were explicitly attentive to the international political economy of education policy. Based on a review of results in English and Spanish from Web of

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Global Forces and Local Responses

Rooted in an international political economy theoretical framework, this book provides unique insights into the global forces and local responses that are shaping education systems in Central America and the Latin Caribbean (CALC).

The book covers all Spanish-speaking countries of the CALC region and examines the effects of macro-economic pressures, geopolitical intervention, neo-colonial relationships, global pandemics, transnational gang networks, and the influence of international organizations. Chapters analyse the challenges and opportunities these global forces present to education systems in the region as well as highlighting the local efforts to address, mitigate, and counteract them. In doing so, the book illuminates how education can contribute to either maintaining or challenging inequalities and exclusion in the face of pressures from the global to local levels.

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