Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 8,746 items for :

  • "neoliberalism" x
Clear All
Author:

50 4 Neoliberalism Ian Cummins Introduction From the mid-1970s onwards, neoliberalism has been the most influential political ideology. This influence has been exercised in several ways. In the global North, neoliberal ideas have underpinned the electoral success of politicians such as Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan. Following their successes, progressive opposition parties such as New Labour under Tony Blair shaped their policies in response to a new political, economic and social landscape that had been created. In the global South, following

Restricted access

497© The Policy Press, 2007 • ISSN 0305 5736 Key words: neoliberalism • neoliberalisation • periodisation • Polanyi Policy & Politics vol 35 no 3 • 497–514 (2007) Periodising neoliberalism? David Craig and Gerry Cotterell English The last decade has seen a number of attempts to periodise neoliberalism and the wider liberal project into different phases. While acknowledging the difficulties any periodisation approach entails, this article proposes a number of core factors against which periodisation might be considered. In its main body, it describes

Restricted access
Author:

53 THREE Implementing neoliberalism The previous chapter’s discussion of the international empirical literature challenged theoretical assumptions that public attitudes to social citizenship will have shifted comprehensively and coherently over the last three decades. It did so by highlighting the varied policy feedback effects known to shape public opinion. Building on this discussion, the present chapter provides an overview of New Zealand’s turbulent political and policy history between 1984 and 2011. Exploring neoliberalism’s shifting nature over its

Restricted access
Author:

In evaluating neoliberalism as a social and economic theory, one should avoid the trap of attributing all the virtues and/or faults of contemporary capitalist society to neoliberalism. Often critics link the practices of governments which they dislike to political and economic outcomes having no, or only an indirect, affinity to any neoliberal ideology or policy. Many denounce or praise ‘the way things are’ as consequences of neoliberalism. Consider Alan Greenspan’s list of the achievements of global neoliberalism: During the past century, economic growth

Open access

269 Critical and Radical Social Work • vol 5 • no 3 • 269–85 • © Policy Press 2017 • #CRSW Print ISSN 2049 8608 • Online ISSN 2049 8675 • https://doi.org/10.1332/204986017X15029697164201 Submission accepted 08 August 2017 • First published online 22 August 2017 article Keywords, care and neoliberalism Paul Michael Garrett, pm.garrett@nuigalway.ie NUI Galway, Ireland The article stresses the continuing significance of keyword-anchored theorising in critical social work. Paying particular attention to England and Wales, the focus is on care as a keyword. Care

Restricted access
Author:

7 Critical and Radical Social Work • vol 2 • no 1 • 7–22 • © Policy Press 2014 • #CRSW Print ISSN 2049 8608 • Online ISSN 2049 8675 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204986014X13912564145528 article (Against) Neoliberal social work John Harris, University of Warwick, UK j.harris@warwick.ac.uk Neoliberalism asserts that it is applicable in domains beyond private sector business. With regard to social work it has three main propositions that it sees as the key to social work’s transformation and three processes that correspond to them: markets are efficient and

Restricted access

and nightlife. They have also been jockeying for position in the creativity stakes. As O’Connor (2022 : 78) puts it: ‘Culture’s high-touch, high-care, jobs rich nature has been squeezed into an efficiency-maximising, profit driven, winner-takes-all competitive pyramid model.’ It is this competitive and almost entirely positive view of urban development that is encapsulated in the idea of the ‘neoliberal creative city’. Yet underneath this creative ‘rat race’ lie a series of seemingly intractable urban problems such as widening inequalities, gentrification, job

Full Access
Author:

73 FOUR Welfare, punishment and neoliberalism This chapter considers the broader impact of neoliberalism on welfare and penal policy. The main thrust of the argument here is that there has been an ideological and culture shift, which can be summarised as follows: the War on Poverty to a War on the Poor. The main thrust of the argument here is that as the state has withdrawn from a programme of social welfare provision, state systems and responses to poverty have become increasingly punitive in their outlook and approach. In the UK, this general trend is

Restricted access
Towards equality and democracy

In this collection, innovative and eminent social and policy analysts, including Colin Crouch, Anna Coote, Grahame Thompson and Ted Benton, challenge the failing but still dominant ideology and policies of neo-liberalism.

The editors synthesise contributors’ ideas into a revised framework for social democracy; rooted in feminism, environmentalism, democratic equality and market accountability to civil society.

This constructive and stimulating collection will be invaluable for those teaching, studying and campaigning for transformative political, economic and social policies.

Restricted access
Author:

457© The Policy Press, 2011 • ISSN 0305 5736 Key words: Foucault • governmentality • governance • neoliberalism Policy & Politics vol 39 no 4 • 457-71 (2011) • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/030557310X550141 Governance and governmentality after neoliberalism Mark Bevir This paper explores synergies between governance and governmentality, especially on neoliberalism. Governance and governmentality diffuse power and ruling. Scholars of governance offer a compelling account of changes in the state, but they might learn from governmentality to pay more attention to

Restricted access