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Revisiting advocacy by non-profit organisations Steven Rathgeb Smith and Robert Pekkanen Advocacy on behalf of citizens and communities is commonly regarded as one of the distinguishing features of non-profit organisation and can be seen as all the more important in today’s world. This article discusses the extant literature in order to provide a conceptual framework to understand non-profit advocacy that is rooted in our understanding of non-profits as political organisations and representatives of citizen and community interests. It then reports on the

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In writing about the importance of non-profit accountability, Ebrahim ( 2016 : 104) describes how non-profit organisations are accountable to many stakeholder groups, such as funders, members, clients and themselves. He and others have described how various tools and processes are used to ensure that non-profits are accountable to these stakeholders, such as legal disclosure rules, programme evaluation or performance requirements, and self-regulation or accreditation processes ( Ebrahim, 2016 ; Jeavons, 2016 ; Mitchell and Berlin, 2017 ). Another mechanism

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, the government has faced numerous challenges in implementing the FSHS policy since its introduction in 2017. Many of the remarkable feats in Ghana’s educational improvements have been achieved through public–private partnerships and, in some cases, private efforts. For instance, many non-profit organisations such as Pencils of Promise, Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO) International and Innovations for Poverty Action play critical roles in ensuring access to quality education in Ghana. They build schools, award scholarships, distribute free learning materials

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21 Voluntary Sector Review • vol 6 • no 1 • 21–39 • © Policy Press 2015 • #VSR Print ISSN 2040 8056 • Online ISSN 2040 8064 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204080515X14251102462737 Towards community engagement in the governance of non-profit organisations Gina Rossi, gina.rossi@uniud.it University of Udine, Italy Chiara Leardini, chiara.leardini@univr.it Sara Moggi, sara.moggi@univr.it Bettina Campedelli, bettina.campedelli@univr.it University of Verona, Italy Nowadays, non-profit organisations (NPOs) face growing pressure to involve the community in their

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Author: Ramya Ramanath

3 Voluntary Sector Review • vol 5 • no 1 • 3–27 • © Policy Press 2014 • #VSR Print ISSN 2040 8056 • Online ISSN 2040 8064 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204080514X13921378298210 research Capacity for public service delivery: a cross-case analysis of ten small faith-related non-profit organisations Ramya Ramanath, DePaul University, USA rramanat@depaul.edu Government-funded contracts are widely known to test the internal capacity of non-profit organisations (NPOs). Smaller faith-related NPOs are considered to be particularly lacking in the capacity needed to

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Technology assistance needs Our clients need hardware assistance 38% 463 Our clients need software assistance 32% 463 My non-profit organisation needs hardware assistance 32% 463 My non-profit organisation needs software assistance 29% 463 No, we do not need these types of assistance at this time 44% 463 Revenue impact Lost revenue since 1 March 2020 71% 473 Donations 70% 332 Fundraisers 67% 332 Fee-for-service 46% 332 Other 16% 332

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Introduction The Carmichael Mentor Programme provides mentoring free of charge to leaders of small non-profit organisations. 1 Leaders are often in a ‘lonely position’, caught between the board and the staff, and they may benefit greatly from being able to work with an independent mentor. External support from someone who is independent, impartial and who has personal knowledge and experience of relevance to their situation can play an invaluable role in supporting them in their position. This paper: provides an introduction to mentoring; looks at

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class, which result from colonial times in the US, are replicated within non-profit organisations, and social groups at the bottom of the hierarchy are not always leading or included within these processes and spaces. Throughout history, systematically marginalised social groups have frequently adopted their own ways of understanding and exercising public leadership to gain cultural, political and economic resources ( DiTomaso and Hooijberg, 1996 ; Scandura and Lankau, 1996 ; Peterson and Hunt, 1997 ; House et al, 1999 ; Kellerman and Webster, 2001 ). Thus, non

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Author: Takafumi Tanaka

199 THIRTEEN Current state of non-profit organisations and the ‘New Public Commons’ Takafumi Tanaka Introduction Lately, there are many books that discuss the non-profit sector or civil society in Japan.1 They mainly focus on the civic movement after the 1995 Hanshin Awaji earthquake, and on the making of the new Law Concerning the Promotion of Specific Non-Profit Organisation Activities (NPO Law). However, this chapter deals with the revision of the Civil Code and the NPO Law after the Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011. The administration of the

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Introduction Since the 1960s, non-profit organisations (NPOs) have increasingly provided support and services as well as advocacy and rights promotion, thus playing a key role in political systems within Western societies ( Schlozman and Tierney, 1986 ; Berry, 1977 , 1999 ; Walker, 1991 ; Baumgartner and Leech, 1998 ; Berry and Wilcox, 2009 ; Johansson and Lee, 2014 ; Yoshioka, 2014 ). During the past 25 years, autism advocacy organisations have also expanded massively ( Cusack, 2017 ). NPOs can potentially convey the interests of groups that are

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