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reports on an action research project which was participatory and used filming to engage people in the research process. It is clear from his description that the project was dynamic and mattered because the participants’ voices were being heard. It is this approach to research that we value highly in our practice. This chapter focuses on only two approaches to research in the community. These are narrative inquiry and action research, the latter including participatory action research (PAR). These have been selected as they are considered by the authors to be of most

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multinational corporations. In a situation of such severe food injustice, research on food cannot be detached or ‘neutral’. It must, if it is to be relevant and ethical, actually contribute towards social change. This chapter argues that participatory action research (PAR), as both a normative commitment and an approach to inquiry, is a means by which research can contribute to food justice. Going beyond both ‘public sociology’ and ‘critically engaged sociology’ in its attempts to empower research participants and respond to their needs, PAR seeks to effect change not only

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exciting, but not unproblematic. While researchers are reflexive about the limitations and drawbacks of community oriented research, reflexivity does not insulate them from these very limitations and drawbacks. Feminist, critical race, post-colonial and Participatory Action Research (PAR) emerge from philosophical and practical trajectories and with radical social justice 5 Introduction aspirations that do not sit easily with institutionalised community engagement. Such engagement seeks solutions to problems framed within the present order, whereas PAR, in

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free mobility of the data collectors in the locale. The criterion for selecting a locale included three key factors significant for studying intersectional marginalization: poverty, history of conflict and a residential area of minority communities. All six shortlisted research sites satisfied all three conditions – that is, they are inhabited by the religious minority groups, have a history of conflict and can be considered as poor in terms of their livelihood practices and living conditions. Participatory methodologies Participatory action research (PAR

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Introduction Shared experiences, informal conversations, and team activities, through which community researchers navigate the research process as a team, lie at the heart of participatory action research (PAR) (McIntyre, 2008 ; Gratton and Beddows, 2018 ). However, as the COVID-19 pandemic shocked communities around the globe and introduced periods of ‘lockdown’ and physical distancing, many community-based projects were forced to adjust to new, remote ways of working or temporarily pause their engagement. This chapter outlines how a participatory research

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147 16 Making social policy internationally: a participatory research perspective Nicola Yeates and Ana Amaya Introduction The relevance of participatory action research (PAR) within policy-facing social sciences is increasingly recognised due to the growing emphasis on research uptake and impact. This is because participatory research affirms stakeholders as agents bringing diverse knowledge and techniques, and a commitment to and ownership of research findings and outputs in ways that are deemed more likely to be translated into action and achieve policy

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work in groups and to find people among them who shared a fate and to express this in a song/poem that they would present. The data that were collected included the poems, the discussion about them, and the ways in which people participated in the discourse. We used poems, stories, plays, photographs, cards, and other methods in the participatory action research (PAR) that we undertook together with young adults with disabilities. The study explored their lives in preparatory programmes for independent living which were run by the NGO, Gvanim. In our research, we

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-based research (CBR): whereby research is conducted as an equal partnership and community members are involved in all aspects of the research process (see Minkler and Wallerstain, 2003, 2008; Strand et al, 2003; Israel et al, 2005), participatory action research (PAR) or simply action research (AR): where through the participation of community members, projects are concerned with collectively improving the quality of their community or the area concerned and may be ideologically or politically motivated (see Reason and Bradbury, 2001; Stringer, 2007). Each of these

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In this chapter we highlight the benefits of using participatory action research (PAR) based upon our long histories of using this approach in our research on sex work, with sex workers and wider communities including residents, criminal justice agencies, and other stakeholders. We draw upon one particular example in our collaborative research that combines participatory arts (PA) with PAR. The chapter opens by articulating the methodological approach of PAR, how we used this method, and how we combined this with PA, highlighting the importance and value of the

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’s mobility and labour struggles. I present a comprehensive account of an academic Participatory Action Research (PAR), conducted in 2017–18 in a region stigmatized as a ‘hotspot’ of trafficking in Nepal ( Bhagat, 2022c , 2023a ). I aim to address the concern of lack of transparency in trafficking research, in addition to addressing some of the methodological questions in qualitative research raised by Hitchings and Latham (2019 , 2020 , 2021) . The chapter begins with a brief overview of the research’s inception, within which I argue the necessity of shifting the focus

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