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Summary This chapter sets out a few examples of high-impact research which has changed and influenced policy as well as practice. I then look at the theoretical and empirical research which tells us how policymakers make decisions and use evidence in the real world. Researchers need to understand this context and the messy and dispersed nature of policymaking, in a world of competing demands. Policymakers may rely on their instincts when responding to and acting on research. They also depend on trusted individuals and organisations, like thinktanks, to make

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31 Evidence & Policy • vol 15 • no 1 • 31–47 • © Policy Press 2019 Print ISSN 1744 2648 • Online ISSN 1744 2656 • https://doi.org/10.1332/174426417X15139342679329 Accepted for publication 04 December 2017 • First published online 31 January 2018 article Policy networks revisited: creating a researcher–policymaker community Rushil Ranchod, r.ranchod@bath.ac.uk University of Bath, UK Christopher Vas, c.vas@murdoch.edu.au Murdoch University, Perth, Australia The need for better linkages between evidence and policymaking has been well established in the

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attributed. The derivative works do not need to be licensed on the same terms. Enhancing evidence-informed decision making: strategies for engagement between public health faculty and policymakers in Kenya Nasreen Jessani, njessani@jhu.edu Caitlin Kennedy, caitlinkennedy@jhu.edu Sara Bennett, sbennett@jhu.edu Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA This article examines the complex interactions and strategies for engagement – both existing as well as desired – between academic Knowledge Brokers (KBs) and national health policymakers in Kenya. Based

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Given the magnitude of the COVID-19 pandemic, it has arguably never been more important for scientists to effectively communicate to policymakers their research about virus transmission, prevention, and the social and economic implications. However, studies of the use of research evidence (URE) have rarely prospectively examined communication strategies for improving the reach of scientific evidence. Scholars studying URE recognise the importance of policymakers’ access to timely and relevant research evidence when policy windows or opportunities open ( Tseng

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answered is just how much demand for more direct involvement there is among citizens and, perhaps even more important, whether policymakers are prepared to share some of their political power and to provide such opportunities to meet this demand. Only very few studies have looked at the perceptions of the policymaking elites in terms of the desirability of more participatory democracy, let alone compared those attitudes with the views of ordinary citizens. Studies based on diverse data (surveys and interviews), mostly emanating from the US context, suggest that

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Key messages This paper adds to the literature on evidence-based policymaking by looking at how policymakers react to evidence in the absence of prior demand. To assess the causal impact of evidence, a field experiment is employed, also increasing the external validity of findings. Results suggest that political elites pay more attention to ideas rather than evidence-based information. Findings show that this also applies across political groups and previous policy support. Introduction Most work on evidence-based policymaking analyses the

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podcasts and blogs. Throughout, the company has followed its core ethos of helping to put research into practice, but, as part of the academic community, it has also adapted to meet – and show that it meets – the calls for greater focus on the benefits of research beyond academia, by trying also to disseminate its authors’ work to non-academic audiences. This chapter describes the efforts Emerald has made to reach one of those non-academic audiences: policymakers. The work described here was carried out by a team of volunteers from around the business, who were

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policymakers allocate EHE resources efficiently and equitably ( Nosyk et al, 2020c ; Quan et al, 2021 ). But to be useful to public health decision makers, the evidence produced by this model must be accepted and used. Population-based simulation models proved quite useful during the COVID-19 pandemic, as researchers tried to estimate the pandemic’s course under different scenarios and assumptions ( Nosyk et al, 2020b ). With increasing public awareness of the value of such modelling, we sought to explore the factors that might facilitate the use of model-generated evidence

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reasons, Jakarta is highly unlikely to protect the safety, health and wellbeing of domestic prostitutes, the government should actively deconstruct the socioeconomic drivers of engagement in sex work. Policymakers and policy-oriented experts should closely, ongoingly, evaluate the rates of, and gender ratios of, the root causes of prostitution, including poverty, unemployment and educational underachievement. The more continuous data are made available, the more tailor-made and predictive intervention policies Indonesia can arrange to discourage women and girls from (re

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Few would dispute that public policy would be better if it were based on research evidence drawn from dispassionate analysis. Yet scientists, professionals, and the general public have criticised policymakers for ignoring research and prioritising partisanship and ideology ( Alemán et al, 2017 ; Peterson, 2018 ). These tensions between research and policy have existed for decades ( Powledge, 2012 ; Parkhurst, 2017 ), but have been exacerbated in recent years ( Trussler, 2020 ), particularly during the pandemic; policymakers in the USA were largely tasked

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