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reparative frame to produce understanding in the service of others. The reflexive focus is also able to be a self-development tool, which may serve to offset the element of unfreedom that can drive an excess of over-responsibility, hidden fragility and hypervigilance without denying the usefulness of already-learnt capacities for resilience. Parental children, relational ethics and psychosocial pedagogy There are indeed gains as well as losses to being parental children. Gregory Jurkovic ( 2014 : xiii) summarises the gains with reference to other literature: As a

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Theory into policy and practice
Author: Neil Thin

The development of happiness as an explicit theme in social research and policy worldwide has been rapid and remarkable, posing fundamental questions about our personal and collective motives and purposes.

This book examines the achievements and potential of applied happiness scholarship in diverse cultures and domains. It argues that progressive policies require a substantial and explicit consideration of happiness. Part one introduces the development of happiness themes in scholarship, policy and moral discourse. Part two explores the interplay between happiness scholarship and a wide variety of domains of social experience, including relationship guidance, managing social aspirations, parenting, schooling, gender reform, work-life harmonizing, marketing and consumption and rethinking old age.

This exciting new text will appeal to policy makers, social organizers and community development practitioners, especially those interested in well-being related policy innovation and social entrepreneurship. It will also be of interest to academics embedded in policy practice.

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Author: Neil Thin

just damage-limitation exercises. Similar levels of interest in toxicity, and disinterest in happiness or even in normal enjoyment and satisfactions, are evident in the literature under other psychosocial pedagogy rubrics such as ‘school psychology’ (Clauss-Ehlers, 2009; Gilman et al, 2009; Peacock et al, 2009), ‘school climate’ (Peterson and Deal, 2009), ‘school social work’ (Kelly et al, 2010), ‘behaviour education’ (Hulac et al, 2010), and ‘school-based 166 Social happiness mental health’ (Christner and Mennuti, 2008; Macklem, 2011). Small wonder that a

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mentoring relations, which is the focus of the first article in this special issue. In that article, Lita Crociani-Windland (2022) opens the conversation by exploring ideas regarding psychosocial pedagogy as a relational practice, predicated on ethics of care. Our fifth contributor, Erica Galioto (2022) , was inspired to take up our theme in her own paper presentation for the next APCS conference in 2020 as a response to what we had presented, resulting in her inclusion here. Overall, the work presented has a psychosocial transdisciplinary perspective. In addition

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working through these configurations with a combination or sequence of autotheory, introspection, psychoanalytic insight, lived experience of the mentoring relationship and an encounter with the aesthetic. We are shown in these articles how painful histories can become a source of generativity about the practice of a psychosocial pedagogy, a practice that combines insights from the alma mater , literally the nourishing mother, and that of her twin, the one who dispenses the precious bane of ‘bitter milk’. Repair and generativity Let none admire that riches grow

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