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Building on Knoepfel’s previous book, Public policy analysis, this book offers a conceptually coherent view of ten public policy resources: force, law, personal, money, property rights, information, organisation, consensus, time and political support. The book demonstrates the interplay of the different resources in a conceptually coherent framework and presents numerous illustrations of ways of mobilising the resources and managing them in a sustainable way, resource exchanges and the role of institutions governing the interrelationships between actors and resources.

The book will be valuable to postgraduate students as well as those working in policy programming and implementation across both public and private sectors and in non-governmental organisations.

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21 Public policy TWO Public policy 2.1 Policy as a response to social problems All policies aim to resolve a public problem that is identified as such on the governmental agenda. Thus, they represent the response of the political-administrative system to a social reality that is deemed politically unacceptable. It should be noted here that it is the symptoms of a social problem that constitute the starting point for the realisation of its existence and of a debate on the need for a policy (for example, decline in the state of forests, drug-associated delinquency

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30 3 Public policy Summary This chapter examines three main areas of public policy, common to almost all governments: economic policy, social welfare services, and policies for society. The idea of ‘policy’ might refer, among other things, to a statement of aspirations, specific proposals, a programme for action, or a field of action.1 In this context, I want only to outline some broad fields of action that governments most actively engage with, because that shapes how we think of ‘the state’. Economic policy It is so much taken for granted nowadays that

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9 1 The foundations of public policy analysis2 Public policies Definitions: Substantive and institutional policies (in particular, ‘resource-based’) The definition of a substantive public policy adopted here is one that I have used since 2001 and formalized in our basic textbook that was published in 2006 [2011]. According to this text, a public policy is: … a series of intentionally coherent decisions or activities taken or carried out by different public – and sometimes – private actors, whose resources, institutional links and interests vary, with a

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This book is an English version of a successful text* on public policy analysis originally written for policy practitioners in Switzerland and France. It presents a model for the analysis of public policy and includes examples of its application in everyday political-administrative situations. This English version introduces supplementary illustrations and examples from the United Kingdom.

Structured and written accessibly for readers who may not have an academic background in the social sciences, Public Policy Analysis applies key ideas from sociology, political science, administrative science and law to develop an analytical framework that can be used to carry out empirical studies on different public policies.

British scholars, practitioners and students are introduced all too rarely to ideas from the Francophone world, and this book will contribute to remedying that. It will be particularly relevant for students and practitioners of public administration.

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Progressive ideas in the neoliberal ascendency

At a time when neoliberal and conservative politics are again in the ascendency and social democracy is waning, Australian public policy re-engages with the values and goals of progressive public policy in Australia and the difficulties faced in re-affirming them. It brings together leading authors to explore economic, environmental, social, cultural, political and indigenous issues. It examines trends and current policy directions and outlines progressive alternatives that challenge and extend current thinking. While focused on Australia, the contributors offer valuable insights for people in other countries committed to social justice and those engaged in the ongoing contest between neo-liberalism and social democracy. This is essential reading for policy practitioners, researchers and students as well those with an interest in the future of public policy.

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395 NINETEEN Academics and public policy Daniel Cohn Introduction Academics—those who hold permanent faculty positions at universities and colleges—have a somewhat privileged place when it comes to public policymaking and analysis in liberal democracies such as Canada. Unlike bureaucrats, they are not burdened by the responsibility of representing an official position with which they might not agree. Unlike politicians and corporate actors, they are free from the need to produce immediate results. These and other freedoms also impose a heavier

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351 SEVENTEEN Media and public policy Andrea Lawlor Introduction Mass media have taken on an increasingly influential role with respect to the design, implementation and critical evaluation of public policy. While media might only be one of many factors that influence policymakers’ decisions, they remain the public’s largest source of information on public policy, and as such, they are the single largest catalogue of political information, covering everything from administrative proceedings, policy change, public opinion on policy matters, to policy

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With an increasingly bitter secular religious divide, there is a messy, defective relationship between the state and morality in the UK. In response, Morality and Public Policy puts forward proposals to enhance the capacity of public policy to respond more effectively to morality and associated shifts in social mores in different cultural settings. Spanning religion, moral philosophy and scientific understanding of the human condition, this unique book draws together and adds to the latest thinking on morality, its causes, mutations, tensions and common features. It challenges misplaced concepts of ‘moral progress’ and the supremacy of empathy, and puts forward the management of the full span of human impulses - some complementary, some conflicting - as the function of morality with major implications for the interface between morality and public policy.

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are transnationally engaged in common responses to these issues. The classic definition of public policies is related to actions undertaken, generally, by governments to solve the problems of society within their jurisdictions. As Jobert and Muller (1987) put it, public policies can be referred to as ‘the state in action’ ( l’Etat en action ). But often problems do not respect national boundaries. Sometimes, public policies need to involve neighbouring countries or various nations, when governments alone do not have sufficient domestic conditions to react to

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