Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 157 items for :

  • "quasi-public" x
Clear All
Authors: and

importance of cybersecurity and its risks have increased with the development of digital technologies, the growing importance of digital economies and the penetration of global geopolitical struggles into cyberspace. The contradiction between the need for collaborative global cybersecurity governance and the fragmentation of the cybersecurity governance system has become particularly pronounced. How to understand the fragmentation of the governance system? What causes fragmentation? Starting from the assumption that cybersecurity is a quasi- public good, this article will

Restricted access

a blossoming of recent literatures about cities (see for example Eade and Mele 2002; Hall et al 2008; Bridge and Watson 2010; LeGates and Stout 2011; Mould 2015). This substantial introduction to the book provides an overview of the substantive topic of urban public space and quasi-public space, followed by a brief overview of the different elements of the neoliberal debate. An elaboration of Lefebvre’s spatial triad follows and the interpretations used in this book are explained. In addition, the importance of Lefebvre’s ideas regarding abstract space

Restricted access

industrial activities. Decline elsewhere has been less dramatic and far from universal, and is in part due to the transfer of activities to a nominally private, but government-funded and regulated, quasi-public sector. Evidence for a move towards a 'post-modern' structure of public employment is mixed.There has been a move towards contracting and quasi-contracting, but in many cases this is a different means oftransmitting bureaucratic regulation. There has been a changing relative distribution towards more part-time and casual work, with a heavy gender bias. Britain does

Restricted access

security should be mapped out, allowing for different points of entry and transfer of skills. • In the light of recent case law, government should consider reviewing whether property law rights of landowners to exclude people without any test for reasonableness are appropriate in the context of modern ‘quasi-public’ spaces such as shopping malls and leisure centres. RP061-text.indd 31/01/2005, 16:0094

Restricted access
Author:

2002 Police Reform Act. Fourth, the Labour government has been keen to continue with the privatisation agenda of the last Conservative government and the policy of ‘contestability’ has emerged, providing further opportunities for the private security sector in community safety. Finally, the nature of the spaces where we live as communities and pursue our leisure activities is increasingly moving from the public to the quasi-public and private domains. All of these issues warrant further consideration before we examine in greater depth the role of the private security

Restricted access
Author:

owners and insiders (as in liberal capitalism) or quasi-public infrastructures and, therefore, constrained in their economic decisions by institutionally sanctioned collective interests. The latter is called organized capitalism, with the collective interests ranging from sectoral interests over class interests to political interests, such as supporting a war economy (Höpner, 2007). Importantly, organized capitalism can both be a ‘friendly’, social-democratic capitalism as in the US New Deal, but also a very dangerous and aggressive form of capitalism, as in Nazi

Restricted access

space, urban planners sought to provide physical access to sites of exchange value consumption. They certainly did this but in doing so they created other potentials. Castlefield’s new bridges stimulated the production of significant new public spaces, in particular the Castlefield Arena. How these spaces, including quasi-public space, came about and how they assumed tremendous importance for the production of space is unravelled in this chapter. Stubbornly, UDCs have retained their fascination and ability to generate simultaneously, awe and angst since the

Restricted access

spaces of a society, including the ways in which youth conceptualise and enact their roles as citizens and contribute to their host society. Publicness The notion of ‘publicness’, that is, the analyses in each chapter of the social scenes in myriad possible settings, along the continuum of private, semi-public, quasi-public, public, hidden, discursive, segregated and non-spaces, is an important issue for refugee youth. This includes reflections on what constitutes the public nature of such spaces. In Chapter 10 , Luke Macauley considers public space as

Restricted access
Authors: and

will be 398 Policy and Politics shown that this ideological concern with distinctions of tenure and ownership goes a long way towards explaining political attitudes towards the housing association movement. Associations are privately administered, yet subject to government control through an unelected body. During the 1960s they received very little subsidy, yet since the mid 1970s the scale of subsidies has greatly increased. Associations can therefore be regarded as being either quasi-public sector institutions because they receive subsidies, or quasi

Restricted access
Authors: and

doing so he adds nuance to familiar depictions of the insider/outsider status of the voluntary sector and large (quasi-)public institutions, a theme later addressed from a somewhat different perspective by van Veelen and Eadson. The recurring pattern of engagement through Dobson’s three case studies is one of discursive acceptance of the aims of the smaller organisations, and varying degrees of financial and practical support, but typically little in the way of influence on substantive or strategic decision-making processes, and a tendency to be marginalised with

Restricted access