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Representations, Theory, and Practice

A book on queer themes and science communication is timely, if not well overdue.

LGBTIQA+ people have unique contributions to make and issues to meet through science communication. So, bringing ‘queer’ and ‘science communication’ together is an important step for queer protest, liberation, and visibility.

This collection examines the place of queer people within science communication and asks what it means for the field to ‘queer’ science communication practice, theory and research agendas.

Written by leading names in the field, it offers concrete examples for academics, students and practitioners who strive to foster radical inclusivity and equity in science communication.

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Content warning: this chapter discusses an abusive 20th century scientific experiment that involved children and also suicide. Political activism is an important domain in which science communication is used to support, or oppose, social change. In the recent past, queer activism has employed science-related arguments with varying results. Like many of the topics covered in this book, the academic literature on science communication in queer activism is sparse to non-existent. Accordingly, this chapter offers a retrospective examination of some of the

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PART IV Queering Institutional Science Communication Agendas

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Drawing on the words and stories of queer Turkish activists, this book aims to unravel the complexities of queer lives in Turkey. In doing so, it challenges dominant conceptualizations of the queer Turkish experience within critical security discourses.

The book argues that while queer Turks are subjected to ceaseless forms of insecurity in their governance, opportunities for emancipatory resistance have emerged alongside these abuses. It identifies the ways in which the state, the family, Turkish Islam and other socially-mediated processes and agencies can expose or protect queers from violence in the Turkish community.

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PART II Representations of Queerness in Public Science Communication

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PART III Queer People in Science Communication Communities

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32 2 Queer Pathways Michael K. Winters Introduction Queer criminology aims to shed light on the ways that general criminology has overlooked the specific but interrelated contexts of offending behavior and queerness (Ball, 2014). Although there have been significant attempts to approach the LGBTQ+ populations as both victims and perpetrators of crime, these understandings largely stem from a cisheteronormative understanding of queerness that largely overlooks or misinterprets the individual’s sexual minority status and gender expression as a criminological

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Technology plays a significant role in our lives. Dominant narratives for technology might centre on the benefits, but for queer people the opportunities afforded by technology are counterbalanced by the consequences. As a younger queer person, access to the information and social networks available through the Internet played a key role in my self-discovery. I vividly remember searching the web using different queer identities as keywords (lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer) while completing online web surveys which promised to concretely label my identity and

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manifestation of existing public discourse, to find out what a particular society already thinks about science, its personnel, and the ‘others’ it contrasts itself to (for example, Haynes, 1994 ). However, almost none of this work has attended to fictional representations of queerness. That is the case whether it refers to diversity in scientific characters’ sexual orientation, gender, and sex characteristics, or fiction’s depictions of queer issues in science. Indeed, diversity in gender and sex characteristics has been rendered still more invisible than usual by the

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“Are there any other identities that are important to you that I haven’t asked you about today?” I asked. “I’m a lesbian,” she declared with a soft smile, which I involuntarily reciprocated. I felt a sense of simultaneous calm and excitement overwhelm as those words hung in the air and we closed out the video interview. While past interviewees had shared their LGBTIQA+ identities when asked this question, this time it resonated with me differently, reinforcing my sense of self and queer belonging in science communication. Researching efforts at building

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