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notions regarding poverty and professional socialisation that join together to direct the attention of social workers to diagnosis and pathologisation. The four chapters in this part of the book borrow from current psychoanalytic theories on the concept of ‘recognition’. Chapter 6 , ‘Poverty, recognition, therapy’, presents the concept of ‘recognition’ and links it to poverty and therapy. Based on a review of works by philosophers and psychoanalysts, the chapter argues that recognition is a basic component of the therapeutic relationship that enables the

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107 FIVE Responses, recognition and reciprocity The introduction of ‘child sexual exploitation’ to social care policy and practice has ensured that the issue is now a safeguarding priority and a child protection concern. While preventative measures focus on reducing risks and educating children and young people about ‘healthy relationships’ and matters of consent, responses to young people caught up in sexual exploitation can include intensive support work or, at the sharp end, removing them to foster care or secure residential units for their protection

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elements in intervention? This chapter deals with these questions. Introduction My main argument is that in order to deal effectively with people living in poverty, that is, to become relevant to them, social workers need to develop a poverty-aware therapy stance. This stance is based on a combination of practices aimed at making a change in the external world and practices dealing with the inner world, with an emphasis on the various roles that power plays in both. The concept of ‘recognition’ was developed in the 1990s by philosophers of critical theory

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97 FIVE Difference and recognition The shooting deaths of several young Black men between 1988 and 2007 were integral events in the becoming of the Africentric Alternative School. The shootings produced a spectrum of affects for those working to develop the school. This affective spectrum would coalesce with other feelings of empowerment and safety produced by the governing and patterned sequences of neoliberalism and biopolitics. This affective amalgam would serve as a powerful catalyst in the development of the school and in the fight against Black

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Key messages • There are several interrelated forms of agency – epistemic, normative and practical – that can be recognised or denied recognition. • Denial of agentic recognition can be case specific or generalised (as in positivist theorising). • Denial of agentic recognition can be sincere or strategic. • Denial of agentic recognition can be other-directed or self-directed. Introduction Recognition in general comes in many flavours, and so do desires and hopes for recognition ( Ikäheimo, 2022 : 10-30; on recognition in international

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RESEARCH ARTICLE Recognition and the origins of international society Erik Ringmar* Department of Political Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden The international system of civilized states that came to develop in Europe in the course of the nineteenth century was formed through practices of recognition, which created and affirmed similarities between all European states, but also through prac- tices of non-recognition, which created and affirmed differences between Europeans and non-Europeans. Practices of non-recognition are generally ignored in liberal

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the underpinning discourses used to justify these changes, such as reducing fraudulent claims and the assumption that disabilities will improve sufficiently for claimants to be able to seek work. In so doing we expose the contradictions ( McGowan, 2019 ) at the heart of these discourses. To help deconstruct this further we draw on Jasbir Puar’s (2017) concept of debility and its interconnection with disability, and Judith Butler’s concept of recognition ( Butler 2016 ). To complement the earlier analysis of the policies and discourse framing at a structural

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277 THIRTEEN Working within associations: recognition in the public space for women? Annie Dussuet and Érika Flahault During the feminist movement of the 1970s, the emergence of the concept of patriarchy as a means of analysing women’s experiences (Delphy, 1972) highlighted how the seclusion of women at home (as housewives) contributed to their oppression. As a result, in a context where many women interrupted their working lives when they had young children, having an occupation was considered as a key enabler of emancipation. Since the 1970s, the rate

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RESEARCH ARTICLE Shame and recognition: the politics of disclosure and acknowledgement Julie Connolly* School of Political Science and International Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia Alongside his critical theory of social recognition, Axel Honneth develops a phenom- enology of shame. He suggests that the harms of misrecognition are registered in feelings of shame, which in turn prompt struggles with, for and over recognition: struggles that he variously describes as emancipatory or progressive. In effect, Honneth suggests that

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RESEARCH ARTICLE Interest, passion, (non)recognition, and wars: a conceptual essay Thomas Lindemann* University of Versailles (UVSQ), Sciences Po, Paris, France This contribution will outline the limits of utilitarian models to the comprehension of interstate war and defend the idea that behind the concepts of interests are always hidden conceptions of (non)recognition between Self and Other. Thus, to pursue objectives such as territorial aggrandizement by war supposes a certain minimization of the ‘Other’ as a simple instrument to obtain something. The hidden

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