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Part Three Towards a recovery framework BF004_Power_text_3.3.indd 269 24/02/2010 10:09:38 BF004_Power_text_3.3.indd 270 24/02/2010 10:09:38

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73 SIX Addiction, inequality and recovery Jenny Svanberg …addiction is unequally distributed among social groups, flourishing most where the power to resist it is weakest (Orford, 2012: xiii) Introduction In all societies, those in lower socio-economic positions experience worse physical and mental health (CSDH, 2008). Although health improvements have been seen in many countries, health inequalities mean that those in more disadvantaged positions experience slower improvements, widening the gap between those at the top and those at the bottom. The World

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93 5 Recovery, research and communities: Sheffield Addiction Recovery Research Group and recovery cities Background and rationale In my work in both the UK and Australia, I have been involved in establishing recovery research groups – first, the Recovery Academy in the UK and, second, Recovery Academy Australia (RAA) based in Melbourne. The work of the Recovery Academy is described in detail in a special issue of the Journal of Groups in Addiction and Recovery (JGAR), which was subsequently published as an edited book (Roth and Best, 2013). The Recovery

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The Role of the Social Contagion of Hope
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Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. This is the first book that uses the latest research evidence to build guidance on community-based rehabilitation with the aim of challenging stigma and marginalisation. The case studies discussed, and a strengths-based approach, emphasize the importance of long-term recovery and the role that communities and peers play in the process. Best examines effective methods for community growth, offers sustainable ways of promoting social inclusion and puts forward a new drug strategy and a new reform policy for prisons.

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Introduction With the frequent occurrence of disasters in the world, research has greater understanding of disasters, including their cause and how to reduce their impacts and expedite recovery. When disasters first began to be studied in the 1950s, they were typically viewed as naturally occurring events that were the product of the magnitude of an earthquake, the ferocity of a hurricane, the infectiousness of a disease or the rise of the sea level, for example. However, understanding of hazards has expanded to include conflicts, price fluctuations and

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151 7 A visible and accessible recovery community In this chapter I will focus on one organisation, Double Impact, which has had a profound impact on my thinking about recovery support delivery. It has created a ‘hub and spoke’ model of visible recovery in Nottingham and in the local area through a commitment to community engagement underpinned by a specific focus on education. What is particularly important for me about this model is how the organisation has engaged with multiple levels of community capital to build social and recovery capital. The

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1 1 What we know about recovery, desistance and reintegration Overview Pathways to Recovery and Desistance is an attempt to build on what we know about how people manage to reintegrate back into communities and society following prolonged careers of substance use and offending. There are a small and very fortunate group of people who get into trouble with the police or develop a problem with drugs or alcohol that manage to overcome those problems without external help, but that is not who this book is written about or for. The focus of this work is about

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10 Recovery and resolution Chapter aim In this chapter we will explore the resources and methods needed by adults at risk and by practitioners to move on from adult safeguarding work. We illustrate a range of approaches to recovery and resolution for adults at risk, including mediation and restorative justice, together with access to counselling and supportive interventions or victim support organisations. In this chapter we will explore: • What do recovery, resolution and restoration mean to adults and those working with them? • The impact of harm on adults

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The problem with recovery Des McDermott Introduction Weinstein has provided a timely overview of the state of mental health social work in Britain under conditions of neoliberalism and, in so doing, has identified the considerable challenges that lie ahead of us. Moreover, the article underlines one of the key strengths of the radical social work tradition, which is its ability to theorise at both micro and macro levels and locate social work practice within a broader political, economic and social context. This is incredibly important at the present time

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Introduction The article focuses on analysing the specificity of recovery from the perspective of clinical social work. The clinical approach is understood here not so much as related to the diagnosis and practice developed in psychiatry, but as embedded in the broader tradition of Martin Buber’s philosophy of dialogue, Carl R. Rogers’ humanistic psychology and contemporary analyses of applied sociology. Being clinical hinges on dialogue, thanks to which the original distance, sense of otherness and caution characterising the contact between social workers

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