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Author: Peter Hopkins

women’s employment experiences and made the point that simply adding racism and sexism together does not address the complex marginalizations experienced by Black women ( Crenshaw, 1989 ). Sensitivity is needed when employing intersectionality, both in relation to its activist and intellectual origins in Black feminism and to ensure that it is not depoliticized and whitened in the process ( Hopkins, 2019 ). Intersectionality is about relationality, social context, power relations, complexity, social justice and inequalities. It is not simply about multiple identities

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to predetermine ethical challenges and develop procedural mechanisms to specify how these will be met. Methodology texts prioritise techniques for data collection and analysis rather than focusing on the researcher as a practitioner engaged in creating and sustaining relationships capable of improving wellbeing and contributing to social justice objectives. This all means that it is still necessary to find ways of understanding what it means to recognise research as a dynamic, relational and political – as well as ethical – practice. What does researching with care

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67 Contracts and relationality FOUR Contracts and relationality This chapter provides a shift in analytical perspective as well as point of observation. Having carried out a semantic analysis of the partnership concept and of the way in which it both opens and closes in a particular way the possibility for organisations to communicate about mutual relations, and having provided a case analysis of communication clashes across function systems in a public outsourcing project, this chapter now provides a semantic analysis of contract semantics in legal theory

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Author: Rich Moth

The previous chapter highlighted the changing labour process at Southville Community Mental Health Team (CMHT), in particular the shift from relational to informational practices. These changes are driven by neoliberal welfare state reforms to embed marketisation and consumerisation while promoting the devolution of responsibility for managing various forms of risk to individual service users and practitioners. In combination, these dynamics constrain spaces for mental health workers to engage in supportive social-relational interventions and reinforce

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Policy & Politics vol 31 no 4 487 © The Policy Press, 2004 • ISSN 0305 5736 Key words: regulatory state • policy capacity • metagovernance • globalisation Policy & Politics vol 32 no 4 487–501 Final submission 31 March 2004 • Acceptance 16 April 2004 The new regulatory state and relational capacity Kanishka Jayasuriya English Globalisation has transformed the internal architecture of the state, leading to the emergence of a new form of regulatory state that operates through mechanisms of metagovernance – that is, the governance of governance. This has

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Introduction How do actors employ relational curiosity to handle conflicts constructively? Existing research demonstrates that conflicts are inherently emotional ( Jones, 2000 ; Lindner, 2006 ; Warren, 2015 ; Hocker and Wilmot, 2018 ) and that emotion plays particular roles in motivating individuals to avoid, confront, resolve and intensify face-to-face disputes (for example, Hocker and Wilmot, 2018: 195–227 ). In particular, conflict researchers have made strides in understanding how potentially destructive emotions such as anger and shame facilitate

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sociology, and engaging with key concepts such as ‘lifecourses’, ‘personal lives’ and ‘relational biographies’, with this chapter I explore the impact that austerity can have on personal and ‘linked lives’ (Elder 1994 ). I consider how these interconnected biographies knit together people and relationships, and spaces of home, care and family, in times of austerity. To illustrate these ideas I draw upon three vignettes – from Kerry, Zoe and Selma – collected as part of an ethnographic research study with families and communities in ‘Argleton’ in Greater Manchester, UK

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children from their parents is a last resort, and the child protection system aims to work with families to improve the situation of children so that they can stay at home and thrive. It appears, then, that an implicit function, or possible outcome, of the ICPC is to build a working relationship between professionals and service users. Do chairs accomplish this, and if so, how? This chapter uses the concepts of ‘relational agency’ ( Edwards, 2011 ) and ‘epistemic justice’ ( Fricker, 2007 ) to make sense of how chairs include family testimony and co-create an

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Introduction Over the past two decades sociology, including the sociology of family and personal life, has seen a ‘relational turn’ with a growing body of work seeking to explain the ‘social’ by taking social relations as the primary object of sociological analyses ( Emirbayer, 1997 ; Crossley, 2011 ; Archer, 2012 ; Dépelteau and Powell, 2013 ; Powell and Dépelteau, 2013 ; Prandini, 2015 ; Roseneil and Ketokivi, 2016 ). Emerging relational sociologies converge in their critique of classical sociological approaches to the study of social life, and their

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Author: Sarah C White

February 2017 • First published online 20 March 2017 article Relational wellbeing: re-centring the politics of happiness, policy and the self Sarah C White, s.c.white@bath.ac.uk University of Bath, UK The ubiquity of references to happiness and wellbeing indicates widespread anxiety that all may not be well, reflecting the erosion of the social in late capitalist modernity. The paper finds that, rather than helping to solve this problem, individualist formulations of wellbeing in policy mimic or deepen the underlying pathology. Drawing on empirical research in

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