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This chapter will help you to understand: why resilience should be seen as a process rather than a thing; how resilience might be developed; why overprotecting children can prevent the development of resilience. 9.1 Why is resilience important? Chapter 7 discussed how in recent years a concern with wellbeing has become very important. But if we want children to experience wellbeing then we also have to consider what contributes to that. Chapter 8 explained how it is that the broader context of childhood can act to make some children more

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159 TEN Resilience Paul Hoggett My personal interest in the subject Why is it that some people can endure incredible hardships over a long period of time and yet still retain their spirit and optimism? And why is it that some individuals and groups can ‘bounce back’ from sudden crises whereas others collapse, go into decline or enter a malaise? The answers to these kinds of questions took me to the study of resilience – the ability of individuals, groups and perhaps whole communities to adapt to adversity and, in some ways, continue to flourish. In this

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23 TWO Resilience and residualism In this chapter I develop a parsimonious concept of social and spatial resilience that is directly applicable to residual arrangements, which I take to be service hubs, while also opening up some critical intent for the term. It is this careful and singular focus on resilience that builds upon, but also sets my work apart from, others who have deployed resilience from a critical (yet more peripheral) perspective (for example, Katz, 2004; Cloke et al, 2010; May & Cloke, 2014). Before proceeding to working definitions of

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The role of social divisions and identities, culture and patterns of social organisation in OCSV is clearly present but poorly understood. In this chapter we develop an intersectional analysis of OCSV research. The empirical data and the wider literature are drawn on to identify how theory on vulnerability and resilience might assist in preventing victimisation. The data almost exclusively situate vulnerability in the context of individualised risk, whereas theory expands these concepts into a wider social frame. We conclude with a framework that incorporates a

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121 SIX Resistance or resilience? Resiliency is like a muscle … that must be developed in advance and consistently exercised [to] be both strong enough to withstand severe challenges and flexible enough to handle a wide range of unpredictable forces.1 Chapter Five argued that time bank theory and practice needs to be more explicit about the value of time, the use value at the core of time bank practices. It further illustrated that time banking can be co-opted into government narratives because the surface value of time, as a measure of volunteering

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Creativity, culture and community

Understanding how creative interventions can help develop social connectivity and resilience for older people is vital in developing a holistic cross-sector approach towards ageing well.

Academics with a wide range of expertise critically reflect on how the built environment, community living, cultural participation, lifelong learning, and artist-led interventions encourage older people to thrive and overcome both challenging life events and the everyday changes associated with ageing.

The book uses a range of approaches, including participatory research methods, to bring the voices of older people themselves to the foreground. It looks at how taking part in creative interventions develops different types of social relationships and fosters resilience.

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181 EIGHT Crafting resilience for later life Jackie Reynolds Editorial introduction This chapter explores the role of long-running craft activities in the lives of older women. The craft activities are understood as both creative and social experiences, and both aspects are seen as supporting resilience responses to the challenges of later life. Resilience is here understood as both individual and communal. The practice of making craft objects also forms the basis for narratives and meanings that contribute to resilient responses to later life. Introduction

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219 ELEVEN The critical resilience of the residuals I first argue that resilience has been ignored by critical geographers perpetually seeking spectacular evidence of transformation, however unlikely or sporadic. From critical approaches to disasters such as heatwaves (for example, Klinenberg, 2002, on how poor Chicago neighbourhoods avoided high death rates) to the survival of surplus populations (for example, Li, 2010, on why Kerala provides for poor people while Indonesia does not), ‘staying put’ (for example, Shaw, 2007, on the Block in Sydney

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production. Here, we focus on one such practice that has grown increasingly common in organisations – fostering employee resilience. Over the past decade, the concept of resilience, as an element of positive psychological capital, has received burgeoning academic attention within the fields of organisational psychology and HRM ( Youssef and Luthans, 2007 ; Bardoel et al, 2014 ; Britt et al, 2016 ). So much so, that the topic has now entered the realm of popular management guru topics, with output intended to cater to the needs of the contemporary corporate manager

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International and comparative perspectives

Population shifts and an increase in the number of natural (and man-made) disasters are having a profound effect on urban and rural habitats globally. This book brings together for the first time the experiences and knowledge of international contributors from academia, research, policy and practice to discuss the role of spatial planning after significant disasters. It highlights on-going efforts to improve spatial resilience across the globe and predicts future trends. Comparisons from five countries including Japan, the US, Indonesia, Slovakia and Germany, highlight the influence of significant disasters on spatial planning and spatial resiliency under different legal-administrative and cultural frameworks.

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