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55 THREE Risk Risk (noun): a situation involving exposure to danger; the possibility that something unpleasant or unwelcome will happen. Risky (adjective): full of the possibility of danger, failure, or loss. (Oxford English Dictionary) In this second of two chapters exploring the ways that young people and professionals made sense of how and why sexual exploitation happens, the discussion moves to a consideration of ‘risk’ and ‘risky behaviours’ in the context of those vulnerabilities previously discussed. Young people’s risk to sexual exploitation is

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This chapter will help you to understand: the ways in which resilience interacts with risk; how safety is prioritised over health in health and safety matters; how concerns with risk limit the lives of children. 10.1 Children, risk and resilience As a student studying childhood or as a practitioner working with children and/or families you will be familiar, or will inevitably come to be familiar, with the practice of making risk assessments. You will also probably be aware of limitations that are placed on children’s activities because of

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PART III Risk narratives

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337 10 Women at Risk Many of the diagnostic judgements made by both experienced and inexperienced individuals will continue to be based on incomplete and imprecise characterization of individual women and babies. (Mohide and Grant 1989: 67) The term ‘risk’ is ... vague and undefined. (Alexander and Keirse 1989: 346) This chapter moves on from the case-study material for the four women presented in chapter 8 and the quantitative findings relating to pregnancy ‘outcome’ discussed in chapter 9 to attempt a synthesis of how all the women in the study regarded

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at Southville CMHT and within inpatient services. It illustrates how a defensive institutional culture around risk management generates tendencies towards what is called ‘custodial paternalism’. It also examines how this marginalises considerations on the effects of racialised inequalities. Upton Ward at the Middletown Centre Mental Health Unit Many of the events in this chapter took place on ‘Upton’ Ward, part of the ‘Middletown Centre’ Mental Health Unit at ‘Westside Park’ Hospital 1 . The hospital is an NHS facility providing adult and older persons

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Risk: technical rationality and beyond The COVID-19 pandemic was inextricably linked to risk. As I note in Chapter 1 , risk can be used as a technical concept, a means of using evidence from the past to predict and control the future. It provides a way of predicting the incidence of natural events such as epidemics caused by pathogenic microbes. Risk is also shaped by social relationships. One of its key elements, outcomes, acquires meaning because of its social significance, with distinct values attached to different outcomes. Given such values, social

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Risk assessment and risk management: the right approach? Hazel Kemshall Introduction and context The ‘risk business’ has been described as one of the world’s largest industries (Adams, 1995), characterised by phenomenal growth and net widening. Crime management has been no exception, with risk forming a key ingredient of penal policy in recent years (see Kemshall, 2003 and 2006 for a full review). In the adult arena this has seen increased attention to the ‘community protection model’ (Connelly and Williamson, 2000), with an emphasis upon public protection

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251 Voluntary Sector Review • vol 7 • no 3 • 251–67 • © Policy Press 2016 • #VSR Print ISSN 2040 8056 • Online ISSN 2040 8064 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204080516X14722016138784 Accepted for publication 15 August 2016 • First published online 02 September 2016 Risk perception and management in development philanthropy Adrian Sargeant, adrian.sargeant@plymouth.ac.uk Jen Shang, jen.shang@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth University, UK For the research on which this article is based, twenty philanthropists, who devoted personal wealth in excess of $5 million to create

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121 Seven From at risk to a risk: regulating social work introduction This chapter discusses the drive towards registration of the social care workforce, detailing the rationale for, and implications of, such measures. These developments should not be seen in isolation; rather they are part of the process discussed in preceding chapters, in which the discourse of risk, vulnerability and abuse is widespread. Chapter Five looked at how this concern with risk minimisation influences both policy and practice in relation to statutory mental health work. Social

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