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Challenging the Geographies of Centrality and Remoteness

This collection shifts the focus of higher education research away from the traditional urban centre and onto small island contexts across the world. Introducing the small island as a context for higher education delivery this book extends beyond the existing literature on higher education in small states, arguing for the value specifically of the small island as a conceptual frame for exploring multiscalar dynamics between global, national and local contexts in higher education provision. Drawing on examples from around the world, the book identifies how the small island opens critical questions relevant to higher education scholarship much more widely about the purposes and functions of higher education especially in relation to national, regional and local development, as well as questions about specific issues in higher education such as quality and management. The insights offered by the contributions in this book will be relevant to higher education scholars as well as scholars in the field of island studies, and especially those concerned with the relationship of higher education provision to regional and island development.

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, contextually considered the inverse of the urban. These shifts have also resulted in further acknowledgement of the variations in understandings of rurality and the recognition of additional categories of spaces identified as ‘rural’, specifically rural areas in small island developing states (SIDS). A total of 58 SIDS with a combined population of 65 million people have been identified by the United Nations. These SIDS tend to be characterized by geographic location and topography, population size and climatic and economic vulnerabilities. Many SIDS have rural economies

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Indonesia highlights the significant difference in economic and human capacity development outcomes. Four of Indonesia’s eastern provinces (Maluku, Maluku Utara, Nusa Tenggara Barat and Nusa Tenggara Timur) are entirely made up of hundreds of small islands and have no territory in any of the main islands. They are the least developed provinces in terms of per capita gross domestic regional product (GDRP; the equivalent of GDP for a sub-national region) and the Human Development Index ( BPS, 2021 ). These provinces had an average Human Development Index score of 67

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truer of institutions located on small islands, or small island states (SIS), where access difficulties are coupled with developmental problems, economic vulnerability, and limited human and financial resources ( Briguglio, 1995 ). In these contexts construed by King (2009 : 77) as ‘spatial laboratories’, that is ‘critically placed nodes within much broader dynamics linking wider spatial realms and processes’, HE institutions face unique constraints and opportunities for internationalization. Studying HE institutions on SIS can therefore help expand our

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387Acting local – thinking local Policy & Politics vol 34 no 3 • 387–405 (2006) © The Policy Press, 2006 • ISSN 0305 5736 Acting global – thinking local: balancing historic marginality and political change in a small island ‘state’ Michael Mannin English This article focuses on the problems that one small island state has encountered in attempting to reform its political system. Jersey, an Offshore Financial Centre (OFC), has experienced considerable difficulty in responding to relatively modest reform proposals contained within the Clothier Report (States of

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Introduction There are six African small island developing states (SIDS): Cabo Verde, Comoros, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritius, São Tomé and Príncipe and Seychelles. As a grouping, they are an underexplored area of study in small state literature (notable exceptions include Baldacchino and Milne, 2000; Thorhallsson, 2000 , 2006 , 2012 , 2018; Srebrnik, 2004 ; Cooper and Shaw, 2009 ; Prasad, 2009 ; Sutton, 2011 ; Graham and Graham, 2016 , 2019; Rana, n.d. ; Sanches et al, 2022 ). This is slowly being remedied, as evidenced by Cheeseman (2021

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theory and practice of entrepreneurship and gender studies, as it describes the roles of women and the relationships of various actors in disasters. It has value added in the SE literature as this chapter contributes to further strengthening of empirical approaches in the field. In terms of disasters, communities residing on small islands are more exposed and vulnerable compared to mainland communities. Moreover, the availability and accessibility of institutional support and assistance in these areas are some of the most common issues among people living on the

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Introduction In this collection we aimed to introduce the small island as a valuable frame for exploring higher education provision, both on its own terms and because of the way the small island foregrounds issues of place and mobility relevant to higher education provision more widely. Although we identified a significant, and valuable, existing literature relating to higher education in small states, we argued that the small island is conceptually distinct from the small state. We also argued that the lens of the small island is especially valuable for

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Introduction The chapter will respond to the key question: how do strengths and limitations emanating from smallness impact higher education governance and management? The primary question investigates elements of governance and management that are specifically related to small islands. The elements that complexify governance and management within a small nation state constitute the focal point of the chapter. Issues discussed range from intimacy and overfamiliarity to a history of colonialism and open economy. The chapter reinforces the book’s theme that

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Why look at higher education in small islands? The ‘spatial turn’ in educational research has resulted in a burgeoning interest in the geographies of education in recent years ( Kraftl et al, 2022 ). In higher education a growing literature has focused on issues of socio-spatial inequality. In the UK, for example, this includes a recognition of the uneven distribution of higher education provision across different geographical spaces, including the close connection of higher education with urban space ( Holdsworth, 2009 ; Holton and Riley, 2013 ), and

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