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Stories of killers and their victims

The relationship between crime and social media has become an increasingly important topic in a networked world. However, the use of social media in relation to violent crime is little understood. This unique book, by an expert in the field, addresses this gap by analysing what those involved in homicide do with social media.

Using three international cases in which perpetrators confessed to homicide on social media, it investigates the practices of those involved, providing a groundbreaking conceptual framework of use to criminologists. It argues that such confessions convey important insights not only into the individual offender but also the social and cultural context of contemporary homicide.

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93 FIVE Social media and the neoliberal subject Introduction In Communication Power Castells (2009) differentiates between what he terms as ‘mass communication’ and ‘mass self-communication’. The former emerged with the rise of new technologies in industrial societies. Newspapers, radio, TV and so on all enabled messages to be communicated to mass audiences. With the rise of the internet, however, a different and more interactive form of mass self-communication has become the norm. More commonly associated these days with social media sites, mass self

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137 TEN Social media and policy evolution in Taiwan Ling-Chun Hung Introduction The rise and development of online technology in the last several years has reshaped politics and policy making in many ways (Leighninger, 2011: 20). In the United States, President Obama used social media applications such as Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and YouTube during his presidential campaign in 2008 and 2012. In Arab countries, many activists who played crucial roles in the Arab Spring used social networking as a key tool in expressing their thoughts concerning unjust acts

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’, the ‘people’, both as ‘objects’ of populist impositions and processes and as their ‘subjects’, indeed, their co-producers. The first question posed is: what is going on with and around people – especially their modalities of ‘being’ and ‘relating’ – rendering them more ‘prone’ to being influenced by populisms and become populisms’ ‘accomplices’? Second, what role do social media play in this imposition/complicity dialectic? Indeed, social media powerfully invade and interpenetrate all levels and processes of the political economy, of people’s everyday experiences

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47 4 Social media data Adrian Tear and Humphrey Southall Introduction As the ‘participatory’ Web 2.0 model has supplanted ‘publication’ on the World Wide Web, several rapidly evolving sites and applications, such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Wikipedia and YouTube, have promoted the creation and enabled, to varying extents, the retrieval of increasingly large volumes of user-generated content. Some of these human-made digital artefacts consisting of text, shared web links, audio, image or video files are publicly posted allowing widespread, although seldom

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Introduction Social media have gradually entered our lives, to the point where it seems almost impossible nowadays to live a whole day completely disconnected. Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, Twitter, Snapshot ... technologically mediated interaction has become a feature of contemporary life. And yet, this technological immersion has not deprived us of the relational dimension of our lives, but rather seems to have made it sharper and more intense. Some technological features of these platforms even amplify the relational choices we are called on to make

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status’. People with insecure immigration status are potentially a highly vulnerable and invisible group (see Chapter 7 , this volume); nevertheless, we find that this group has been very visible in British media coverage. Little knowledge exists on public views towards undocumented migrants and how people regard the state’s responses, with most previous research limited to newspaper analyses. These studies emphasised a widespread negative portrayal of migrants as cultural and security threats ( Allen, 2016 ; Gray and Franck, 2019 ). Social media presents an

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51 3 #humblebrags and the good giving self on social media So it’s time for Humblebrag of the Week. They’re all over social media, boasts disguised as moans. Here’s one: “Just gave up my seat for an old Gurkha soldier. He didn’t want to accept it – I insisted. #nicefeeling.” This is another classic: “A huge thanks to Donna at Pitsea station who saved my pashmina. It was from Thailand when I volunteered teaching English at an orphanage.” Oh sod off! Yeah, I get it, you’re great – if you were really that great you wouldn’t tell anyone! (The Elis James and

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149 EIGHT Discussion: the complex contexts of social media homicide confessions Throughout this book, the author has presented a range of themes, concepts, issues and cases at the intersection of media and homicide. The book aims to make better criminological sense of social media homicide confessions and develop more robust frameworks for the future study of such cases. The purpose of this final chapter is to outline the insights that have been generated from the three case studies and consider their implications for current theorising and future

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Implications and Opportunities for Practice

The COVID-19 pandemic has shed fresh light on the ways that social media and digital technologies can be effectively harnessed to support relationship-based social work practice. However, it has also highlighted the complex risks, ethics and practical challenges that such technologies pose.

This book helps practitioners and students navigate this complex terrain and explore and build upon its multiple opportunities. It uses real-life examples to examine how practitioners can assess the impact of new technologies on their professional conduct and use them in a way that enhance public confidence and relationship-based practice.

The authors explore how digital technologies can support multiple areas of service including social work with children, families and adults, mental health social work, youth justice and working with online communities. They also consider regulatory questions and provide a roadmap for good practice.

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