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Past, Present and Future

This collection charts the key developments in the social work field from 1970 to the present day and shows how by fully understanding social work’s past, we can make better progress for practitioners and service users in the future.

It brings together a broad collection of experts from across social work who trace how thinking and approaches to practice have changed over time, examine key legislative developments in the field, look at the impacts of major inquiries and consider the re-emergence of certain specialisms.

Providing students and practitioners of social work and social policy with a full picture of the evolution of social work, it also shares important insights for its future directions.

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The Rise and Fall of a Profession?
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Rogowski’s second edition of this bestselling textbook responds to the major changes to social work practice since the first edition was published. It is fully revised and updated to include new material that is essential for students and practising social workers today.

Taking a critical perspective, Rogowski evaluates social work’s development, nature and rationale over approximately 150 years. He explores how neoliberalism is at the core of the profession’s crisis and calls for progressive, critical and radical changes to social work policy and practices based on social justice and social change.

This new edition is substantially updated to explore:

• the impact of austerity policies since 2010;

• failures to realise the progressive possibilities which followed the death of ‘Baby P’;

• contemporary examples of critical and radical practice.

It also includes a range of student-friendly features including chapter summaries, key learning and discussion points, and further reading.

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90 FIVE The professionalisation of social work? Chapter summary Professional social work’s zenith came under Thatcherite attack because of the alleged incompetence of practitioners and their radicalism. As a result, professional education increasingly moved to a concern with training and competencies as employers became more influential in the Central Council for the Education and Training in Social Work. This continued under New Labour, despite the introduction of the social work degree and an emphasis on continuing professional development. Key learning

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139 eighT politics and social work introduction The ‘radical social work’ movement of the 1970s highlighted the class struggle in British society at the time, and the way in which social work acted in the interests of the ruling class (Bailey and Brake, 1975). In the 1980s, social work embraced other factors such as sexuality, race and gender as areas where oppression occurred, either in association with, or irrespective of, social class (Langan and Lee, 1989). Today, there are also voices calling for social work to awaken from its slumber and recognise

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23 TwO politicising social work Functional social work: early 1970s style The 1970s saw increasing attempts to organise social work as a profession. In 1971 there was both the publication of the first issue of Social Work Today, a trade magazine for the profession, and the setting up of the British Association of Social Workers (BASW). The following year saw the inaugural edition of the British Journal of Social Work (BJSW) arguably still, in academic terms at least, the most prestigious of the many social work journals. The BJSW was linked with the newly

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Lessons for social work internationally

What is the relationship between social work and the state? Who controls which services needs are addressed and how? This important book looks at social work responses in different countries to extreme social, economic and political situations in order to answer these questions. Examples include: war situations, military regimes, earthquakes and Tsunamis. The results show the innovative nature of grass-roots provision and social work intervention and will be of interest to all social work academics, students and professionals.

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41 Three ‘depoliticising’ social work introduction The General Social Care Council (GSCC) set up under the 2000 Care Standards Act replaced the Central Council for Education and Training in Social Work (CCETSW) as the governing body of the social work profession. A search of its website (www.gscc.org.uk) in June 2007 with the keyword ‘oppression’ found a mere five results, only two of which are in policy documents (the other mentions were in two literature- based discussion documents, and one speaker biography). This hardly constitutes an obsession with the

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Social work at the crossroads

Created to celebrate the 35th anniversary of Bailey and Brake’s seminal text Radical Social Work (1975), this volume seeks to explore the radical tradition within social work and assess its legacy, relevance and prospects.

With a foreword by Roy Bailey, the book brings together leading academics within social work in Britain to reflect on the legacy of Radical Social Work (both the original text and the wider social movement) within social work education, theory and practice.

With the current issues facing social work in Britain, this book examines the radical tradition to assert that ‘another social work is possible’.

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111 SIX Managerialism and the social work business Chapter summary The rise of managerialism and the social work business under Thatcherite and New Labour governments were based on neoliberal themes of economic competitiveness, social policy being subsumed to the needs of the economy, limited government/state intervention, and controlling public expenditure. From this, managerialism aims to control what social workers do and how, while the social work business is concerned with reducing public spending and extending market forces into social work/care. Key

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97 6 Practising social work Guy Shennan Introduction: a practitioner’s account Given the nature of social work, with all its messiness, it might be fitting to begin a chapter on changes in social work practice since 1970 with something of a paradox. The logician Irving Copi presented the philosophical problem of identity (in the sense of sameness) across time via the following two statements about change, each of which appears to be true, but inconsistent with the other. 1. If a changing thing really changes, there can’t literally be one and the same thing

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