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361© The Policy Press • 2007 • ISSN 1744 2648 Key words narrative • synthesis • implementation • methodology Evidence & Policy • vol 3 • no 3 • 2007 • 361-83 re se ar ch Testing methodological developments in the conduct of narrative synthesis: a demonstration review of research on the implementation of smoke alarm interventions Lisa Arai,1 Nicky Britten, Jennie Popay, Helen Roberts,1 Mark Petticrew, Mark Rodgers and Amanda Sowden English In the context of systematic reviews, statistical meta-analysis of findings is not always possible. Where this is the

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and implementation deficits on the other, the international community needs to reform the global governance system. In this context, the authors of this volume have aimed to learn from past mistakes and to offer suggestions for more and more thorough environmental protection in global sustainability governance. The volume concludes with a synthesis along the three guiding questions that bind the chapter together: 1. How have perceptions of the environment changed in sustainability governance and research since the 1992 Earth Summit? 2. Which actors and

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attributed. The derivative works do not need to be licensed on the same terms. Evidence synthesis for knowledge exchange: balancing responsiveness and quality in providing evidence for policy and practice Sarah Morton, s.morton@ed.ac.uk Karen Seditas, University of Edinburgh, UK Barriers to using research in practice are well documented. This paper describes an innovative process developed by the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships to address these barriers. We supported people to define what they needed to know; how existing evidence could help

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systematic reviews where EPPI-Centre staff gave methodological guidance in the fields of education and development studies. Additional learning has come specifically from our analysis of the aims, methods and contexts of the What Works Centres ( Gough et al, 2018, 2021 ; Gough, 2021 ), more generally from advances we have made with synthesis methods by taking this approach from medicine to health more broadly, and to other social policy sectors ( Gough et al, 2017 ), and insights about networks come from working with partners across the global south in PEERSS. 1

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barrier to research of the phenomenon as well as finding effective ways to support the growing number of individuals who engage in it. In light of this debate and the intention of the authors to capture a broad range of research, the present review and synthesis focused on self-injury with nonsuicidal intent, referring to it as ‘NSSI’ but purposefully did not specify any one method by which it is enacted. Prevalence The prevalence of self-injury has risen worldwide over the past two decades and although exact figures vary by country, sample setting, and method of

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463© The Policy Press • 2007 • ISSN 1744 2648 re se ar ch re se ar ch Key words healthcare • gender • access • review Gender and access to healthcare in the UK: a critical interpretive synthesis of the literature Ellen Annandale, Janet Harvey, Debbie Cavers and Mary Dixon-Woods English Because gender traditionally has been perceived as the preserve of women, gender- comparative research in access to healthcare has been rare. We report a critical interpretive synthesis of the relevant literature, and present the outline of a theoretically grounded framework for

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Key messages A responsive rapid evidence synthesis programme commissioned by the NIHR HSDR programme has addressed topics identified as priorities for the UK National Health Service (NHS). Rapid production of high-quality outputs is facilitated by initial evidence mapping and topic scoping. Involvement of stakeholders at key stages maximises value and potential for impact but the impact of evidence on decision making remains poorly documented. Evidence synthesis programmes should seek the optimum balance between decision makers’ needs for rapid and

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information in front of a patient, especially while many more wait, is neither practical nor appropriate. In addition to this, in our rural northern Ugandan context, we do not have access to many of the clinical tests, medications or equipment required to execute the recommendations. This likely risks doctors returning to unevidenced and potentially unsafe practices that they have become accustomed to, rather than adopting the recommendations from the guidelines. Clearly a context-specific synthesis of clinical practice guidelines, that provides quick and easy access to

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155 Key words social care • research methods • methodological quality • systematic review © The Policy Press • 2008 • ISSN 1744 2648 Evidence & Policy • vol 4 • no 3 • 2008 • 155-82 • 10.1332/174426408X338839 re se ar ch Examining the state of adult social care research 1990-2001: a systematic synthesis of research methods and quality Siobhan Reilly, Chengqiu Xie, Sally Jacobs and David Challis This article reports on a systematic synthesis of the research methods and quality of peer- reviewed empirical research relating to adult social care services (1990

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219 22 The inequality hypothesis: thesis, antithesis, and a synthesis1 Dorling, D. and Barford, A. (2009) ‘The inequality hypothesis: thesis, antithesis, and a synthesis’, Health & Place, vol 15, no 4, pp 1166-9. In the pages of [Health and Place] Min Hua Jen, Kelvyn Jones and Ron Johnston recently presented a paper claiming to have evaluated Richard Wilkinson’s hypothesis that social inequality damages the health of populations (Jen et al., 2008). It was an interesting paper with findings not originally recognized in Wilkinson’s hypothesis, but it suffers

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