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43 THREE Systematic reviews for policy David Gough and Janice Tripney Research to inform policy Social science is concerned with the study of society and the individuals within it. Policy is the articulation of aims and principles for action, and is used particularly for organisations with remits to undertake action, such as local and central governments. As policies are often concerned with societal and individual issues, social science may provide insights and research results to inform such policies. This chapter is concerned with systematic methods for

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503 Evidence & Policy • vol 2 • no 3 • 2006 • xx-xx © The Policy Press • 2006 • ISSN 1744 2648 Evidence & Policy • vol 2 • no 4 • 2006 • 441-61 Social care research: a suitable case for systematic review? Elaine Sharland and Imogen Taylor English This article examines how systematic reviews might best address social care research. In the context of broader methodological debate, it draws on recent first-hand experience of undertaking systematic reviews in this field, to propose that research inclusion, quality assessment and synthesis should be guided by certain

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197 Evidence & Policy • vol 14 • no 2 • 197–220 • © Policy Press 2018 Print ISSN 1744 2648 • Online ISSN 1744 2656 • https://doi.org/10.1332/174426417X14987303892442 Accepted for publication 09 June 2017 • First published online 04 July 2017 research Producing policy relevant systematic reviews: navigating the policy-research interface Sandra Oliver, s.oliver@ioe.ac.uk Mukdarut Bangpan, m.bangpan@ucl.ac.uk Kelly Dickson, k.dickson@ucl.ac.uk UCL Institute of Education, UK This study employed insider research and reflective practice to investigate exchanges

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269Making transport policy work: polity, policy, politics and systematic review Policy & Politics vol 35 no 2 • 269–88 (2007) © The Policy Press, 2007 • ISSN 0305 5736 Key words: evidence-based policy making • systematic review • meta-analysis • transport policy Final submission July 06 • Acceptance August 06 Making transport policy work: polity, policy, politics and systematic review Fritz Sager English In this article, we propose a research framework for systematic review based on the fundamental trichotomy of polity, policy and politics, which we argue

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403© The Policy Press • 2011 • ISSN 1744 2648 re se ar ch Evidence & Policy • vol 7 • no 4 • 2011 • 403–28 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/174426411X603434 Key words systematic review • evidence-based policy • research impact • knowledge transfer strategies to promote the impact of systematic reviews on healthcare policy: a systematic review of the literature Frances Bunn and Katie Sworn The last few decades have seen a growing emphasis on evidence-based decision making in healthcare. Systematic reviews synthesising research have been a key component of this

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branch in public policymaking raises questions about the use of research evidence within this specific setting. In particular, for what purposes is research evidence used in legislatures, and what are the facilitating and hindering factors? These are the main questions that this article seeks to answer. An update of a systematic review of the empirical literature on the factors hindering and facilitating the use of research evidence in policymaking was conducted eight years ago ( Oliver et al, 2014 ). The approach of studying facilitating or hindering factors for

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109© The Policy Press • 2006 • ISSN 1744 2648 Key words systematic review • qualitative • critical appraisal • quality criteria Critically appraising qualitative research for systematic reviews: defusing the methodological cluster bombs Pamela Attree and Beth Milton English This article examines the place of qualitative research within systematic reviews as evidence for policy, discusses the critical appraisal process as applied to qualitative research, and gives illustrative examples of sound qualitative studies from the health policy field. A checklist is a

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399 Key words bullying • school • systematic review • young people © The Policy Press • 2009 • ISSN 1744 2648 Evidence & Policy • vol 5 • no 4 • 2009 • 399-427 • 10.1332/174426409X478761 Secondary school teachers’ and pupils’ definitions of bullying in the uK: a systematic review Niamh O’Brien The aim of the systematic review (SR) reported in this article was to compare how UK secondary school pupils and teachers define bullying, using the analytical framework proposed by Naylor et al (2006). Findings were drawn from five major studies – two quantitative

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health policy, the research-policy-practice gap remains wide. This gap greatly necessitates the need to further synthesise what is known about how research evidence is used by public health decision makers involved in policymaking to gain a fulsome and current understanding. One of the studies that addressed this need was a systematic review exploring the use of research evidence in the processes used for public health policy decision making ( Orton et al, 2011 ). Orton and colleagues (2011) synthesised data from 15 qualitative and 3 quantitative studies of mixed

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literature, lack of time to read and assess articles, and lack of critical skills for judging evidence quality as factors limiting decision makers’ use of research results ( Kyle et al, 2006 ; Armstrong et al, 2014 ). Studies have also shown that producing systematic reviews does not make scientific evidence more accessible to decision makers ( Bunn and Sworn, 2011 ; Perrier et al, 2011 ). Also, decision makers need to be able to assess the relevance of the evidence for their domain and to foresee the conditions necessary for its transferability ( Cambon and Alla, 2013

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