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Why Theory Matters and What to Do about It
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The field of digital technology in education has long been under-theorised.

This book will enable the reader to reflect on the use of theory when explaining technology use and set out ways in which we can theorise better. It explores the concept of theory and looks at how teaching, learning, and technology itself have been theorised. With relatable international case studies, it shows how theories underpin optimistic and pessimistic accounts of technology in education.

This innovative book will help readers to understand more deeply the use of digital technology in education, as well as the idea of theory and how to develop a distinctly educational approach to theorising.

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This book explores the relationship between the state and war within the context of seismic technological change.

As we experience a fourth industrial revolution, technology already exerts a huge impact on the character of war and military strategies in the form of drones and other types of ‘remote’ warfare. However, technological developments are not confined to the defence sector, and the diffusion of military technology inevitably also affects the wider economy and society.

This book investigates these possible developments and speculates on their ramifications for the future. Through its analysis, the book questions what will happen to war and the state and whether we will reach a point where war leads to the unmaking of the state itself.

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Technology plays a significant role in our lives. Dominant narratives for technology might centre on the benefits, but for queer people the opportunities afforded by technology are counterbalanced by the consequences. As a younger queer person, access to the information and social networks available through the Internet played a key role in my self-discovery. I vividly remember searching the web using different queer identities as keywords (lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer) while completing online web surveys which promised to concretely label my identity and

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Key message This paper explores digital violence against women and how women use technology to resist violence and seek ‘justice’. Technologies have, over centuries, wrought changes in the speed and forms of our self-expression, interactions and relationships. More recently social and geographic boundaries have been permeated and tested by digital media and devices. While machines exist in the ‘real’ world their applications are ‘spaceless’; not bound to fixed locations and infiltrating many spaces of our lives. Information communication technologies

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Interpersonal violence persists across all landscapes, yet research and efforts to prevent and regulate such harms have been focused primarily on non-urban locations. As technology infiltrates all spheres of our lives, it is increasingly used to enact interpersonal violence: this lethal and non-lethal violence occurs in both familial and care settings (including child abuse, intimate partner abuse, elder abuse) and community settings (such as bullying, harassment and assault by acquaintances, strangers or persons who may be known, in social environments

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125 SIX Dementia and technology Mary Marshall Technology in the future People constantly look to modern technology to improve their lifestyles. This includes for example, personal computers, the use of the Internet, technology used in hospitals, the telephone and the television and devices such as washing machines and vacuum cleaners. One of the ways in which life could improve for older people is in the harnessing of new technology in new, imaginative and profitable ways. (Royal Commission on Long Term Care, 1999, p 2) This optimistic section of the Royal

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-enter a society that is very different from the one they left when starting their sentence. The fast-paced developments in digital technologies over the last 20 years and the ubiquitousness of the Internet and digital devices has changed the way societies work, which leaves returning citizens overwhelmed by a speed-of-light society (Jewkes & Reisdorf, 2016 ; Reisdorf & Jewkes, 2016 ). Even short spans of disconnection from the Internet and digital devices have been shown to have negative effects, such as missing out on benefits or job offers (Gonzales, 2016

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’s ownership of tablets rose from 2 per cent to 40 per cent over the same period (Ofcom, 2015 ). Running parallel with these changes in the available hardware, internet speeds and capacities have improved steadily, enhancing the functionality of mobile devices, with the consequence that children increasingly use these devices to access the internet (Livingstone et al, 2014 ). The UK Time Use Surveys, collected around 2000 and 2015, capture these changes in children’s access to computer technology and the internet in the home. Table 5.1 shows the proportion of children

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I have now looked at theories that have emerged, first, to explain the contribution of technology to learning and, second, how teachers use technology. In this chapter I turn to technology itself. In an obvious way the whole book has been about technology but technology deserves a chapter in itself as researchers have not always been explicit or consistent when discussing the user’s relationship to digital tools. There are six sections: What is a technocentric view of technology? The idea of an affordance We live in hybrid environments We participate

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231 TEN Technology and the creative citizen Jerome Turner, Dan Lockton and Jon Dovey The starting point for our Creative Citizen research project was a question asking whether and to what extent digital communications technologies afford new civic potential. We also invited ourselves to consider how this potential might be enhanced by digital media, thereby making an assumption that agency and significance might properly be ascribed to technology in its relation to creative citizenship. As we have seen in the preceding chapters and their detailed accounts

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